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Thirty Months Off – Renée is drug free and getting healthier everyday

By Renée Schuls-Jacobson — It’s been thirty months since I took my last bit of Klonopin, a dangerously addictive medication that a doctor prescribed for me when I was suffered from insomnia. Thirty months since my world flipped upside down. — These days, I don’t take any prescribed medication. None. And I dumped my psychiatrist. …

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The Future of Mental Health Interview Series

By Eric R. Maisel Ph.D. Rethinking Mental Health Posted first on Psychology Today — the series should be followed there. The work from this site, Beyond Meds will be covered in one of the interviews. … This blog post introduces a hundred-day series of interviews on Psychology Today with folks from around the world committed to non-traditional ways of helping individuals suffering from emotional and mental distress.

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I am heartbroken and badass, at once

Sometimes I know things that I don’t want to know. Or I may see something that I can’t unsee no matter how bad I want to. And usually it’s not something I know or see strictly in my mind, but something I feel and see within my heart. That makes it harder to put what I am feeling or seeing into coherent thoughts or to find words to describe what I feel. All I have, is a giant hot soup of heavy feelings without any logical flow. When it’s like this, I remember two things:

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On being a compost pile

As I think about waste in my life, not just material waste like trash and plastic, but also psychological waste, I enter this thought stream to investigate if natural intelligence sustainable and efficient in the same way nature is? Is there such a thing as psychological waste or are we actually busy composting inside? …

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Natural Intelligence: our human inheritance

By Jen Peer Rich — Amid the noise of the modern industrialized world, woven intimately within the striving that comes with living in a broken system of economic and social hierarchies, and underpinning the dominate culture machine that tells us who we are, there is another layer of life happening that is hardly noticed.

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Recovering or adjusting to illness?

By Lewis Mehl-Madrona M.D. (psychiatrist) — Many of us were not surprised when the research failed to support the currently dominant biomedical model of psychiatry. A 2015 panel at the American Psychiatric Association’s annual meeting in Toronto confirmed that even more research is accumulating to question the benefits, if any, of the long-term use of anti-psychotic medication. Paris raises the question, why doesn’t research change anything? … [click on title to read the rest]

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Depression as pain

So much talk of disease these days. Depression is a disease. Mental illness is a disease. — The language of disease is soothing: there is nothing wrong with you, you are not crazy, you are not different, you are not “less.” You just have a disease. Like diabetes. — Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong condition: you take your insulin, you are fine (well, sorta: you also have a shorter life expectancy and likelihood of nerve damage, eye damage, etc.). So is the “disease” of mental illness. Nothing to be ashamed of. It doesn’t mean you’re weak, or that someone hurt you. It’s no one’s fault. — So here’s what’s wrong with this lovely, guilt-free approach to mental pain. one: it dooms you to a lifetime of disability. You are a lifetime depressive, bipolar, OCD sufferer, schizophrenic. The disease is here to stay. … [click on title to read the rest]