Fear is contagious. You can catch it.

fear

“Fear is contagious. You can catch it. Sometimes all it takes is for someone to say that they’re scared for the fear to become real. Mo was terrified, and now Nick was too.” ― Neil Gaiman, The Graveyard Book — This is true fear is contagious. It’s something worth deeply contemplating. We need not fear, however, because one can also free oneself by recognizing what has happened. Then the contagion comes to an end. Observation is a form of illumination. Fear is a shadow energy and it cannot survive illumination. In other words Franklin D. Roosevelt was right. There is nothing to fear but fear itself. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Befriending fear

trust

The practice of being with all that arises within. Fear here can be translated to “anxiety,” which is the clinical term for fear which everyone at one time or another experiences with or without a diagnosis of some sort of anxiety “disorder.” Psychiatry pathologizes much of the normal human experience and fear and/or anxiety often referred to in Buddhism as such. Normal. There are techniques to learn how to be with these normal feelings, whether they’re very intense or not. — And boy does protracted psych drug withdrawal open the floodgates of fear and terror and trauma, like nothing else. It’s not like anything natural that occurs before drug damage as those of us gravely impacted discover. But even with this sort of iatrogenic damage I’ve found that the best solution is to treat it like all the rest. I’ve decided that in the end, it’s the same thing as though on steroids. … [click on title to read and view more]

Welcome the fear, the anxiety and thus transform it

life force

Anxiety is basically a clinical term for fear which everyone at one time or another experiences with or without a diagnosis of some sort of anxiety “disorder.” Psychiatry pathologizes much of the normal human experience and in opposing fashion fear and/or anxiety is often referred to in Buddhism and other alternative philosophies as normal. A normal form of human suffering. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Fear: be with it

gary:rich

The idea of “Being with what is” — my favorite mantra is also shared here. I’ve come to believe all fear and terror and anxiety is essentially the same…even that which gets pathologized by psychiatry. All fear is experienced in the body on a physiological spectrum, let’s say. So it will all respond to this sort of framing. It has for me in any case. As someone who has dealt with the iatrogenic injury from psychiatric drugs I can speak to this. Even the heinous iatrogenic terror I’ve dealt with as a result of acute psychiatric drug withdrawal syndrome which seems to be a variety of extreme and complex PTSD, responds to these methods, though, clearly it can take a long time and a lot of work. I write about how I started doing that in baby steps here. That journey continues since the reprograming of the neural networks take time given the sort of brain injury the drugs incurred. … [click on title to read and view more]

We can be AWARE. We can wake-up. We can heal ourselves. (anxiety)

teal

Why is it assumed that people need remain unaware of their physiological experience? This is exactly what meditation can attend to. It’s called “mindfulness” for a reason. It’s entirely possible to become aware of our bodies, minds and psyches. The fact that many of us are asleep does not mean we cannot wake up! This sort of knee-jerk conclusion that determines we are helpless in the face of all our physiology strips people of their inheritance. We can be AWARE. We can wake-up. We can heal ourselves. … [click on title to read and view more]

It gets better: Speech Psych Drug Withdrawal Symptoms (Dysarthria)

captiveflower

NOTE: the below symptoms can be found in any protracted psychiatric drug withdrawal syndrome and are not limited to benzodiazepines. The autonomic nervous system is potentially impacted by all the different classes of psych meds and thus these neurological symptoms can be seen when coming off any class of psych drug. … [click on title to read and view more]

Fear is life force… (in clinical circles it’s often called anxiety) – also an IT GETS BETTER post

fear

This information may not resonate or be appropriate for everyone, but it’s information that should be shared with people in mental health settings so that they might choose to delve into (or not) these body/mind mysteries if they feel so inclined. That would also entail creating safe (residential) places where people could delve deeply into these realms and perhaps not appear functional to the world for some time. That is what deep healing sometimes demands. Our culture doesn’t create such deep healing places right now. Without such deep healing places people will continue to be harmed by psych meds when perhaps, if they knew there were other ways of delving into and healing the body/mind complex they might choose those ways. The choice needs to be created. For now far too many have no choice. … [click on title to read and view more]

Releasing Fear with Yoga

cobra

Whether we realize it or not, fear is often a large part of life. The fear of disappointing others, fear of taking career risks, or fear of not accomplishing goals can affect our mental and physical states of health over time. Someone who constantly lives with feelings of fear and anxiety can develop high blood pressure, sleeplessness, depression or even a heart condition. A complete yoga session that includes pranayama, meditation and stretching can help release fears and teach people to live a more mindful, grateful life. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Novel way of thinking about anxiety…

buddha

There’s a term in Buddhism, manasikara, which means attention. It’s a fundamental component of awareness because it directs the mind to it object — it’s the charioteer of the mind that directs it where to go. It comes in two forms: appropriate and inappropriate attention.

Anxiety is a form of inappropriate attention. A scripture describes a monk whose meditation practice revolved around obsessively ruminating on things that were making him unhappy. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Anxiety and desire…

desire

Anxiety and desire are two, often conflicting, orientations to the unknown. Both are tilted toward the future. Desire implies a willingness, or a need, to engage this unknown, while anxiety suggests a fear of it. Desire takes one out of oneself, into the possibility or relationship, but it also takes one deeper into oneself. Anxiety turns one back on oneself, but only onto the self that is already known. There is nothing mysterious about the anxious state; it leaves one teetering in an untenable and all too familiar isolation. There is rarely desire without some associated anxiety. We seem to be wired to have apprehension about that which we cannot control, so in this way, the two are not really complete opposites. But desire gives one a reason to tolerate anxiety and to push through it. … [click on title to read more]

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