Letter to the Mother of a “Schizophrenic”: We Must Do Better

will hall

Again and again I am told the ‘severely mentally ill’ are impaired and incapable, not quite human. I am told they are like dementia patients wandering in the snow, with no capacity and no cure, not to be listened to or related to. I am told they must be controlled by our interventions regardless of their own preferences, regardless of the trauma that forced treatment can inflict, regardless of the simple duty we have to regard others with caring, compassion, and respect, regardless of the guarantees of dignity we afford others in our constitution and legal system. I am told the “high utilizers” and “frequent flyers” burden services because they are different than the rest of us. I am told the human need for patience doesn’t apply to these somehow less-than-human people. And when I finally do meet the people carrying that terrible, stigmatizing label of schizophrenia, what do I find? I find – a human being. A human who responds to the same listening and curiosity that I, or anyone, responds to. … [click on title to read the rest]

Love and sex and attachment

why

I have shared Helen Fisher’s work before on Beyond Meds. She has done important work looking at how psychiatric drugs affect bonding and love. That post is here: Psych drugs damage ability to love/bond. I also consider in it what might be happening to young people who are going through sexual development while growing up on these drugs in that post. What I’m sharing today is much more generalized and not specifically about psychiatric drugs. There are a lot of details about romantic love in 21st century. I found it quite interesting and often quite optimistic while also taking a sobering look at the reality we find ourselves in. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Understanding our bodies…a skill to develop and trust. MDs often don’t support this.

love

This issue comes up again and again among the folks I frequently hang out with online. People so badly want to find the perfect doctor and get very frustrated when again and again they are disrespected and/or given treatments that further harm them. I figured out a long time ago that I understand my body far better than any doctor does and the only MDs I’ll work with now (on an ongoing basis) are people who actually appreciate this. I never enter a new relationship with a health professional with any expectations as well. It allows for much less frustrating experiences. At the very best I’ll find a partner in my care…not someone who will tell me what to do without regard to my own particular experience. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Mystical principles of healing

tree

“The unresolved traumas in individuals and in various cultures are again bursting open. Humanity is literally crying out for new developments that enable us to work through our individual and cultural traumas. If we do not succeed in this, the traumas that have not been integrated will force us to repeat the corresponding traumatic experiences again and again. This principle applies to the further development of the world as well as to the individual journey of healing.” … [click on title to read the rest]

Kelly Brogan M.D. on psychiatric drug withdrawal

kelly

Millions of patients find themselves caught in the web of psychiatric sorcery – a spell cast, hexed, potentially for life. They are told that they have chemical imbalances. They are told that the most important thing they can do for themselves is to “take their medication”, and that they will have to do so “for life”. … [click on title to read the rest]

Restoring Balance with the Plant World

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Seeing our mental health as part of a more global ecological picture where how we eat and the food we grow and buy has a direct effect not only on our mental health, but on how we can heal some of the wounds we have inflicted on our relationship with the planet. The global ecological and environmental trauma that is occurring is mirrored in the trauma that we experience in our own lives- the disconnection, the isolation, the lack of the sacred. We can help to heal ourselves in part by re-envisioning how we work with the plant kingdom, feed ourselves and live with the land. … [click on title to read the rest]

What is deeply and thoroughly understood will not repeat itself

book

Ibookn self-awareness there is no need for confession, for self-awareness creates the mirror in which all things are reflected without distortion. Every thought-feeling is thrown, as it were, on the screen of awareness to be observed, studied and understood; but this flow of understanding is blocked when there is condemnation or acceptance, judgment or identification. … [click on title to read the rest]

Peace in the chaos

gazelle-leaping1[1]

The peace that we’re looking for is not peace that crumbles as soon as there is difficulty or chaos. Whether we’re seeking inner peace or global peace or a combination of the two, the way to experience it is to build on the foundation of unconditional openness to all that arises. Peace isn’t an experience free of challenges, free of rough and smooth, it’s an experience that’s expansive enough to include all that arises without feeling threatened. … [click on title to read the rest]

To be hopeful in bad times…

howardzinn

To be hopeful in bad times is not just foolishly romantic. It is based on the fact that human history is a history not only of cruelty, but also of compassion, sacrifice, courage, kindness. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Is This Depression? Or Melancholy? Or…

melancholy

By Will Hall — “Depressed.” — It’s a word I put in quotes because, like so many words we use to describe our mental health experiences, it has as much power to confuse as it does to clarify. We live in a culture bombarded by media and sped up by rapid-fire social interactions. It’s definitely useful to grab hold of a simple, short, sound-bite term, to quickly describe what we are feeling or suffering. “Depression” is such a word – it evokes and encapsulates, conjures the images of that ugly pit of despair that can drive so many to madness and suicide. Yet at the same time the words we use, strangely, become like those pens deposited in medical offices and waiting rooms around the world: ready at hand, easily found, familiar — and tied to associations, marketing and meanings we were only dimly aware were shaping how we think. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

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