Nisargadatta on accepting and acceptance…

These are some statements by Nisargadatta Maharaj on the topic of acceptance…piggy backing on the last post here on Radical Acceptance. These three passages come from I Am That. Nisargadatta led a very humble life in a poor part of Bombay. He wasn’t insulated from the vicissitudes and tests of everyday life — in other […]

Spring is upon us. A little celebration of the details.

Like splinters in one’s soul – other people’s beliefs, feelings, emotions and trauma…Healing is the cleansing off all of the collective scum to pure awareness without conditioning. Wash off the samsara….drop the stories… let go of the interpretations …

Alienation causes fear and fear deepens alienation

But when you look at anything as separate from you, you cannot love it for you are afraid of it. Alienation causes fear and fear deepens alienation. It is a vicious circle. Only self-realisation can break it. Go for it resolutely. … [click on title to read and view more]

This is the great work of awareness…

By being with yourself, the ‘I am’; by watching yourself in your daily life with alert interest, with the intention to understand rather than to judge, in full acceptance of whatever may emerge, because it is there, you encourage the deep to come to the surface and enrich your life and consciousness with its captive energies. This is the great work of awareness; it removes obstacles and releases energies by understanding the nature of life and mind. Intelligence is the door to freedom and alert attention is the mother of intelligence. [click on title to read more]

My heart wants you awake…

My intention to wake you up is the link [between our respective dreams]. My heart wants you awake. I see you suffer in your dream and I know that you must wake up to end your woes. When you see your dream as dream, you wake up. But in your dream itself I am not […]

I am that…

Much of our contemporary Western notions of “acceptance” have roots in teachings from Nisargadatta and others from the East. … Pain is essential for the survival of the body, but none compels you to suffer. Suffering is due entirely to clinging or resisting; it is a sign of our unwillingness to move on, to flow with life. As a sane life is free of pain, so is a saintly life free from suffering. A saint does not want things to be different from what they are; he knows that, considering all factors, they are unavoidable. He is friendly with the inevitable and, therefore, does not suffer. Pain he may know, but it does not shatter him. If he can, he does the needful to restore the lost balance, or he lets things take their course.

The more we are conscious, the deeper the joy

These are some statements by Nisargadatta Maharaj on the topic of accepting reality as it is. These three passages come from I Am That. Nisargadatta led a very humble life in a poor part of Bombay. He wasn’t insulated from the vicissitudes and tests of everyday life — in other words, he spoke from experience. […]