Trauma release exercises (or tension release too) — the body speaks

(Update 2015 – From the archives. This is something I can again do now if and when appropriate. Our body/mind/spirit changes as it heals. I also found that the neurogenic tremors arose spontaneously in my yoga practice quite often when I simply relaxed in savasana at the end of a yoga session. I took to letting them come. Our bodies know this stuff. It is not new, it is ancient knowledge that our bodies know. How silly that we need a trademarked version to make us remember. But alas, most of us do. This is a good system. Go easy and listen to the body. If it’s not the right time for this it’s not the right time. Those of us with severely impacted nervous systems from psychiatric drug withdrawal need to become highly adept at respecting the body’s timing. It always knows best. ) This is a post I did about a year ago. I’ve not been using this particular method of release anymore as it actually prompts a release that is too much for my compromised body at this time. The method, is, however, very good for people who are physically healthy and not in rehab. I’m sharing the post again because I continue to find that our bodies hold trauma and psychological distress in ways that we are just beginning to understand. We are truly holistic beings and our minds and bodies are intricately intertwined. The segments I share about the video talks a bit about that.

The body releases trauma and restores goodness

In a lifetime of working with traumatized individuals, I have been struck by the intrinsic and wedded relationship between trauma and spirituality. With clients suffering from a daunting array of crippling symptoms, I have been privileged to witness profound and authentic transformations. Seemingly out of nowhere, as with Nancy from Chapter 2 who was held […]

The Trauma that Blinds Us

Trauma can be like a repeating record, a time-loop, circulating through another kind of time. The same octave notes keep repeating, said one writer, until they get heard. Yet many trauma therapies come short in matching the compulsive sense of truth that can be the perfume of most traumatic experiences. …

Trauma and the body

Trauma that is held in the body over time freezes…the healing process requires defrosting…it can be painful…physically and emotionally. Their is no separation between body and mind. The body is mind, the mind is body. So what is done to the body is done to the mind and what is done to the mind is done to the body. It’s a vibrant, synergistic relationship of oneness.

Mindfulness in trauma flow

There is a concept of “flow” …or stream entry in Buddhism…when we are moving along with the energetics of NOW…we are in the moment and not burdened by future or past. It is the natural state of *being here now*. (to use Ram Dass’s terminology) I’m proposing (because I’ve experienced it) a sort of flow […]

Trauma, subpersonalities, the lie and constant change (parts)

Healing, more than anything, becomes an exercise in learning to trust oneself. This is especially important when there are people about who want to force us to do things that are counterproductive to healing. Unfortunately the medical and psychological establishments perpetuates many such treatments. My village has been patch-worked together from all over the world. I’m profoundly grateful for the internet given I would not have healed otherwise.

Raw, Open and Real: Moving From Traumatic Aloneness to Universal Oneness

“We don’t have many models for what it looks like to persevere on this healing journey and many stop prematurely. A crucial piece is the willingness to be present with our own pain. As humans it’s natural to want to avoid pain, but usually it’s the avoidance of pain that is more painful than the actual pain. That’s why support is so essential. The wound begins in relationship and the ultimate healing occurs in relationship as well.” … [click on title to read the rest]