Holding on to beliefs limits our experience of life

One of my practices is to not attach to beliefs. We really know very little. What is true most often depends on context and interpretation. Both of which are always changing and differ from person to person. What is right for me may not be right for you. What is right for me today may not be what I need tomorrow.

Practicing non-attachment to belief and also being aware of when perhaps I’m not able to do this has opened up my world in lovely ways. Fixation is stagnation. Dogma is a fixation of belief.

Healing and resiliency, I’ve found, require a lack of fixation…a sort of fluidity of spirit and intention. It is from this place that much of my healing comes. … [click on title to read and view more]

Faith…does not mean the belief in assertions for which there is no evidence

Faith…does not mean the belief in assertions for which there is no evidence. It never meant that in genuine religion, and it never should be abused in this sense. But faith means being grasped by a power that is greater than we are, a power that shakes us and turns us, and transforms us and heals us. Surrender to this power is faith. … [click on title to read and view more]

Beyond belief

We realize that life is ugly, painful, sorrowful; we want some kind of theory, some kind of speculation or satisfaction, some kind of doctrine, which will explain all this, and so we are caught in explanation, in words, in theories, and gradually, beliefs become deeply rooted and unshakable because behind those beliefs, behind those dogmas, […]

On belief and believing…

Buddha entered a village. A man asked him as he was entering the village, “Does God exist? “He said, “No, absolutely no.” In the afternoon another man came and he asked, “Does God exist?” And he said, “Yes, absolutely yes.” In the evening a third man came and he asked, “Does God exist?” … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Beyond Belief: Taking Spirituality Seriously

We must be the change we want to see in the world!

spiritualityMany have argued that the world’s problems may be ultimately ‘spiritual’ in nature, and much of the population, atheists and believers alike, claim to have a spiritual dimension to their lives. But what do we really mean by the spiritual? … [click on title for the rest of the post]

For the geeks among us: Belief and choice…

For the geeks among us who like to tinker with the nature of reality…

We choose what to believe based on our beliefs and then our beliefs are limited by the choices we’ve made. Sound self-limiting? It is! This structure is considered to be the foundation of paradigms, and you are probably painfully aware of how difficult it is to change these. As for the annoying characteristic mentioned above — it’s called stubbornness, and other less polite words.

Beyond belief

I shared this little blurb of an idea I had with some friends: Different belief systems come from different experience and the human experience is endlessly diverse. It’s nothing short of arrogant to think that our little personal idiosyncratic experience has led us to the ultimate truth. I question my beliefs everyday, knowing that belief […]

Does the “brain disease” belief actually reduce stigma? NO, it increases it

“The results of the current study suggest that we may actually treat people more harshly when their problem is described in disease terms,” Mehta wrote. “We say we are being kind, but our actions suggest otherwise.” The problem, it appears, is that the biomedical narrative about an illness like schizophrenia carries with it the subtle assumption that a brain made ill through biomedical or genetic abnormalities is more thoroughly broken and permanently abnormal than one made ill though life events. “Viewing those with mental disorders as diseased sets them apart and may lead to our perceiving them as physically distinct. Biochemical aberrations make them almost a different species.”