David Steindl-Rast: Want to be happy? Be grateful

There is something you know about me, something very personal, and there is something I know about every one of you and that’s very central to your concerns. There is something that we know about everyone we meet anywhere in the world, on the street, that is the very mainspring of whatever they do and whatever they put up with, and that is that all of us want to be happy. In this, we are all together. How we imagine our happiness, that differs from one another, but it’s already a lot that we have all in common, that we want to be happy. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

David Oaks Message to the World, “Cracking the Nut of Normality”

by David Oaks
After 4 decades as a psychiatric survivor human rights activist and 3 decades with spinal arthritis (ankylosing spondylitis), that fused my spine into peanut brittle, I knew I needed a break. The break that I got about 3 weeks ago was not the one I expected. I slipped off a wet ladder in my writer’s studio, and it resulted in a complete break of my neck.

What is Love? What is Trust?

Jack Kornfield and Brother David Steindl-Rast are two of my favorite men in the world (along with Gabor Mate). Love seeing them together here. At the Greater Good Gratitude Summit, the renowned authors and religious teachers define love and trust, and explore the relationship between these two critical concepts … [click on title to read and view more]

Thanksgiving: a day to consider a practice of gratefulness

As Brother David Steindl-Rast says, whether one is religious or secular, it’s hard to argue against gratefulness. How much gratefulness we feel has little to do with whether life seems abundant or filled with hardship. On the contrary, it hinges on the degree to which we are prey to the delusion that we are self-made, or instead have discovered that life is a process in which we endlessly stumble into the unknown. Let’s never forget what a wondrous planet we live on — a place where staggering beauty can suddenly sweep up from the horizon. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Gratefulness as practice

As Brother David Steindl-Rast says, whether one is religious or secular, it’s hard to argue against gratefulness.

How much gratefulness we feel has little to do with whether life seems abundant or filled with hardship. On the contrary, it hinges on the degree to which we are prey to the delusion that we are self-made, or instead have discovered that life is a process in which we endlessly stumble into the unknown.

Let’s never forget what a wondrous planet we live on — a place where staggering beauty can suddenly sweep up from the horizon. … [click on title to read the rest]

Consider gratitude

I want to suggest and even underscore that practicing gratefulness does not entail denying the difficulty in our lives.

A good day to consider a practice of gratefulness

Practicing gratitude came upon me as a form of grace. It was not something that made a whole lot of sense to me during the darkest times of illness. No, gratitude did not come easy from that darkest of dark nights and yet the little there was I clung to for dear life (quite literally). For me the bearers of this gift were my cats. While there was nothing else I could find any consistent source of comfort from, I could find it from my cats. For that, I was profoundly grateful and because I had that gift my practice of gratitude began. … I want to suggest and even underscore that practicing gratefulness does not entail denying the difficulty of our lives. I think it’s equally important to honor and embrace our pain and anger and hurt. If we are feeling those things we need to approve of and love the parts of us that feel all those things. That does not negate also being grateful for that which we can be grateful for. So many times when things like gratefulness or forgiveness or other virtues are considered the message is that we should not feel all the bad stuff. I say that’s crap. Feel it all…the bad and the good. Feel grateful and angry. It’s all good and necessary. … [click on title to read and view more]

Christian contemplative prayer/meditation

I’m sharing some Christian contemplatives today. I generally share information from Eastern traditions or that which is largely influenced by Eastern tradition, but the fact is I’ve been greatly influenced by the Christian mystics too and the contemplative practice in the Christian tradition is deeply meaningful as well. Modern Western mystics have largely abandoned the […]

Teachers who inspire…

I’ve put together a post with a list of teachers or otherwise inspirational people I often quote or refer to on Beyond Meds. Here below many of them are listed with a distinctive quote from their work and a link to the posts on this blog where more of their work is shared. This post […]