Rethinking Depression

The general argument here can be made about all labeled psychiatric disorders. Most often, they are not brain disorders as popularly understood in psychiatry, but instead a combination of many things in our lives and environments intersecting with our bodies, too. … [click on title to read and view more]

Rethinking depression

People often want to believe that depression has some distinct pathology. It does not. Clinical depression is very much a garbage pail term for feeling shitty and that may manifest in a large number of ways and have many different combinations of etiologies.

Depression as pain

So much talk of disease these days. Depression is a disease. Mental illness is a disease. — The language of disease is soothing: there is nothing wrong with you, you are not crazy, you are not different, you are not “less.” You just have a disease. Like diabetes. — Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong condition: you take your insulin, you are fine (well, sorta: you also have a shorter life expectancy and likelihood of nerve damage, eye damage, etc.). So is the “disease” of mental illness. Nothing to be ashamed of. It doesn’t mean you’re weak, or that someone hurt you. It’s no one’s fault. — So here’s what’s wrong with this lovely, guilt-free approach to mental pain. one: it dooms you to a lifetime of disability. You are a lifetime depressive, bipolar, OCD sufferer, schizophrenic. The disease is here to stay. … [click on title to read the rest]

Is This Depression? Or Melancholy? Or…

By Will Hall — “Depressed.” — It’s a word I put in quotes because, like so many words we use to describe our mental health experiences, it has as much power to confuse as it does to clarify. We live in a culture bombarded by media and sped up by rapid-fire social interactions. It’s definitely useful to grab hold of a simple, short, sound-bite term, to quickly describe what we are feeling or suffering. “Depression” is such a word – it evokes and encapsulates, conjures the images of that ugly pit of despair that can drive so many to madness and suicide. Yet at the same time the words we use, strangely, become like those pens deposited in medical offices and waiting rooms around the world: ready at hand, easily found, familiar — and tied to associations, marketing and meanings we were only dimly aware were shaping how we think. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Contrary to popular opinion “major depression” can respond to non-drug options!

YES, thank you…don’t believe the hype about how essential drugs are in severe cases. It’s possible to make healthy choices and avoid neurotoxic and dangerous drugs most of the time. People need to be offered options as a very real possibility. As it stands now people are often misled to believe they need drugs when another method of care may actually be more appropriate for long-term positive outcomes. “Alternative” care needs to become mainstream so that people might become truly and deeply healthy. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Rethinking bipolar disorder

A collection of links to other posts from the Beyond Meds archives that look at that which gets labeled “bipolar disorder” from different perspectives so that we might be challenged to think outside the psychiatric box.

Contrary to popular opinion “major depression” can respond to non-drug options!

YES, THANK YOU…don’t believe the hype about how essential drugs are in severe cases. It’s possible to make healthy choices and avoid neurotoxic and dangerous drugs most of the time. People need to be offered options as a very real possibility. As it stands now people are often misled to believe they need drugs when another method of care may actually be more appropriate. “Alternative” care needs to become mainstream so that people might become truly and deeply healthy. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Rethinking bipolar disorder

it’s clear that the collection of phenomena that is labeled bipolar varies from individual to individual and they have many different etiologies. Labeling them as if they are all the same monolithic thing only serves to muddy the waters and often serves to trap the individual in a toxic prison of confusion and psychopharmaceuticals that are difficult to get off of.

Featured post

On Adam Ant: fame, depression and infamy

You’ve been away from the music business for so long. Why come back now?

‎”…I was on a lot of anti-depressants, which I now know I’m physiologically allergic to. I had to get my health straight, so I said ‘look guys, I don’t feel I can do it’.

So then I went away and, with the help of my GP, I very gradually came off that particular drug. It took me six months to get it out of my system and I’m pleased to say I feel kind of better.”

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