Carl Jung on living an authentic life

It could be argued that at the heart of Jungian therapy is the aim of experiencing and living an authentic life.

That is not the language that Carl Jung used, but it does express a central idea of his psychology, which he called ‘individuation.’ Put very simply, individuation is the process by which individuals become more fully themselves.

Individuation involves differentiating oneself from conformity with collective values, which does not necessarily mean rejecting those values. Rather, it means the ability to choose the values by which one will live instead of merely living out social norms in an unreflective and unconscious way.

In other words, the individuation process is a deepening and maturing of one’s individuality and sense of authenticity. … [click on title to read and view more]

Carl Jung’s Words of Advice for the Depressed

By Jason E. Smith — From Jung’s point of view there is a hidden intention in depression. It “forces us downwards.” This is not, as it might sound, a punishment for arrogance, but rather a consequence of having become cut off from the human, instinctual part of ourselves. … [click on title to read and view more]

From Jung's Red Book

Carl Jung himself thought he was psychotic

Carl Jung himself said:

I had the feeling that I was in an over-compensated psychosis, and from the feeling I was not released until August 1, 1914.

And yes, he recovered, transformed and went on to thrive, just like so many others, from that psychosis… … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Red Book — Jung’s dialogue with the serpent

“What he discovered were manifestations of both his personal and collective unconscious. In this sense, he demonstrated by personal example that the enigmatic phenomenon we call “psychosis” is often about being completely inundated or possessed by the personal and archetypal unconscious rather than caused by a genetically predisposed biochemical imbalance or “broken brain,” that it has psychological and spiritual significance, meaning and purpose, and that it can potentially be psychotherapeutically treated with the proper skills, commitment and knowledge.” … [click on title for the rest of the post]

CG Jung And The ‘Leap Of Faith’ Into Individuation

The Red Book has been described as Jung’s creative response to the threat of madness, yet it has also been seen as a deliberate exercise in self-analysis. I believe it’s likely both. When creating The Red Book, Jung knew he was on the verge of madness, and he also knew his analytical skills and expertise as a psychiatrist were his best chance at alleviating suffering, if not creating the conditions for transformation. … [click on title to read more]

Carl Jung had what would today be called an extended psychotic episode

Carl Jung himself said:

I had the feeling that I was in an over-compensated psychosis, and from the feeling I was not released until August 1, 1914. (see here for context)

His psychosis lasted a long time and he worked it out. This is a stunning revelation that will be even more controversial then all the body of his work to this day.

There was an unpublished book that has, many years after his death, been made available. The Red Book. It’s a lovely and emotionally stunning book in my opinion. The art alone is worth the purchase price.