Dancing in the Flames. (in memory of Marion Woodman)

Dancing in the Flames is a brilliant and intimate documentary into the life of Jungian Analyst, Marion Woodman, who is known for her ground breaking work as a teacher and author on feminine psychology and addiction. We are taken into a metaphoric representation of the unconscious imagery that Marion discusses so passionately and, in doing so, are invited to examine our own lives. Brilliant mystic and author Andrew Harvey interviews Marion as she explains the mysteries of her soul’s journey and reveals a series of psychological ‘deaths’ and ‘rebirths’ that have formed the consciousness into which she has evolved. The film presents a philosophy of dynamic opposites, the bridging of seeming contradictions. Life and death, love and grief, courage and submission are not at loggerheads for her—they’re part of a harmonious whole. By embracing these opposites we come into the totality of human experience. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Dancing In The Flames (Marion Woodman talks about the Mother)

“I can tell you that it takes great strength to surrender. You have to know that you are not going to collapse. Instead, you are going to open to a power that you don’t even know, and it is going to come to meet you. In the process of healing, this is one of the huge things that I have discovered. People recognized the energy coming to meet them. When they opened to another energy, a love, a divine love, came through to meet them. That is what is known as grace. We all sing about amazing grace. It is a gift. I think that it comes through the work that we do. For some people, it can come out of the blue, but I know that in my own situation, the grace came through incredible vigilance.” … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Addiction: what is it?

Addiction is a societal issue. Consumerism and capitalism is dependent on the addict in everyone. Recognizing this fundamental issue with our society is part of a much deeper social commentary that this speaks to. Gabor Mate, Marion Woodman and others speak to this expertly if you’d like to do further research. Our society needs healing, it’s not just particular individuals who need to heal. We are all connected. Inextricably so. This argument can be true and we can also note real differences in how people use drugs. There is no argument there on my part. Language is inherently imprecise and context must always be considered.

Ask, not why the addiction, but why the pain?

I’ve not come across anyone else who more elegantly speaks to the pain and trauma of humanity than Gabor Maté. He clearly explains how that which gets labled mental illness, addiction and most chronic physical illness is in large part the result of childhood loss and trauma.

Another voice that touches on some of these themes is Marion Woodman. She points out our addiction to stuff is killing us. We need to own our inner addicts. All of us. Together these two weave an important social commentary as well as raising a public health emergency that needs tending to. I’ve not come across anyone else who more elegantly speaks to the pain and trauma of humanity than Gabor Maté. He clearly explains how that which gets labled mental illness, addiction and most chronic physical illness is in large part the result of childhood loss and trauma. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Learning to live again…

This is a little collection of thoughts I’ve written down in the last month and a half or so. I’m still getting a grip on what happened and these are some of my musings. My best to all who visit here today and always.

Addiction: it ain’t what you think

Professor Alexander argues this discovery is a profound challenge both to the right-wing view that addiction is a moral failing caused by too much hedonistic partying, and the liberal view that addiction is a disease taking place in a chemically hijacked brain. In fact, he argues, addiction is an adaptation. It’s not you. It’s your cage. …

Healing as opposed to curing

Healing to me does not mean returning to what one was before something went wrong. Wholeness does not necessarily mean normal. And even the word recovery is problematic because, frankly, I don’t want what I had before. Who wants to go backwards anyway? Healing means being whole even while still perhaps not functioning like others. Healing also suggests some sort of maturation and growth from “before” for all that is learned on the journey. Ultimately now, I see this journey as one of transformation and individuation. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

This is who I am—take me or leave me

Take time to listen to your dreams, to write them down. Take time to recognize that there are things going on within you that need to be felt, or said, or lived, or grieved. Pay attention to these things both in yourself and in the people in your life. Pay attention to the authentic self. … [click on title to read and view more]