Speaking to “normals” about our hypersensitivity

Through the years, as a means to survive, I’ve sculpted my social-media so that I don’t have to listen to a lot of otherwise very offensive stuff about the experience of those of us with extreme sensitivities,  and iatrogenic and chronic illness. Still, because I care about some of the folks who continue to say insensitive, ignorant things about us, I do encounter it from time to time. In fact we cannot hide from the ignorance in the world about our experience and still live in the world and so I’m entering a phase of healing and learning that is helping me re-enter the world. That means facing such insults daily. …

Oliver Sacks helps me explain hypersensitivity

Humans can discriminate between similar odors and detect many substances, sometimes more than rodents and dogs. — The Myth That Humans Have Poor Smell Is Nonscents – The Atlantic — We can also know which herbs will heal us and when it’s appropriate to take them (a delightful thing I’ve learned as an amateur herbalist as I heal my brain) we are insanely out of touch with our animal selves. We have instinct and intuition like all animals…we can relearn and remember these skills…

Somatic mysticism: reframing “hypersensitivity”

More musing from the past few days. Anyone who has ever been called too sensitive might appreciate some of this. I’ve recently been drawn to the term “somatic mysticism” because I feel everything deeply in my body. I can feel my cells doing their work quite often and I feel all manner of metabolic movement and […]

Multiple drug sensitivity

UPDATE 2018: I later learned that doctors, even this kind man who validated me couldn’t and didn’t know how to heal me or, beyond validating my experience, know how to help with supplements or anything at all really. I learned that in the end the sort of healing I was going through was so radical […]

It gets better: Extreme sensitivity to noise, touch, movement, commotion etc…

During these times I was unable to sit upright in bed. I was only able to walk to the bathroom and rarely to the kitchen. My muscles became totally atrophied. I was too weak to hold a toothbrush up to my mouth and therefore went a couple of years without doing what most people consider simple acts of hygiene. I wrote with the laptop propped on my knees and my head propped up a bit with a pillow. Writing was a lifeline that helped me continue. It’s been a source of great joy to find out that my keeping this blog has helped so many others.

This is not my reality anymore. I am up and out of bed. I practice yoga daily. I dance, I walk and I cookand run errands and do chores. I have not achieved perfect functioning. I still can’t make firm commitments or travel. Still I can enjoy many things in life and I’ve developed a deep appreciation for what I’ve been through and how much it has taught me. Life is a wondrous thing and simply being alive is a reason to be grateful as far as I’m concerned. … [click on title to read and view more]

Limbic Kindling — hardwiring the brain for hypersensitivity and chronic illness

This is a very interesting and important article. It’s in keeping with my posts on how the autonomic nervous system is impacted in psychiatric drug withdrawal and how that is similar in many different chronic illnesses. This piece goes into a broader understanding of these issues. The author concludes that healing from these illnesses requires tending to the whole body/mind/spirit complex. This has become very clear to me as I continue to heal.

Sensitivity in its highest form is intelligence

Sensitivity in its highest form is intelligence. Without sensitivity to everything – to one’s own sorrows; to the sorrow of a group of people, of a race; to the sorrow of everything that is – , unless one feels and has the feeling highly sensitivized, one cannot possibly solve any problem. … [click on title for the rest of the post]