We all have stories and context — diagnosis try to strip that away from us

Everything that happens in our lives (and all our encounters with psychiatry) are SITUATIONAL. Always. There is no such thing as a clinical depression without a "situation." That is a ludicrous and destructive fantasy. The same is true for anyone with any diagnosis. Schizophrenia, bipolar, anxiety, OCD. We all have stories and context. Diagnosis try to strip that away from us. The fact is EVERY single person with a diagnosis has an individual, unique story and context. Everything matters. Diagnosis (as currently most frequently used) are reductionistic lies that try to remove us from the fabric of our lives. ...

Depression Delusion: an introduction by the author, Terry Lynch, MD

By Terry Lynch, MD -- I know people can recover fully having received diagnoses of depression, bipolar, schizophrenia, OCD, eating disorders and borderline personality disorder. I know because I have seen this, both in my work, and through contact with people over many years. Full recovery is possible. Hard work, but possible. The common medical response to recovery – that it must have been a misdiagnosis and the person never actually had that condition – does not suffice. The people I am talking about met all the medical criteria for these psychiatric labels. Psychiatry is the only medical specialty where the mindset does not routinely include aiming for the best possible outcomes. … [click on title to read and view more]

Marijuana for Mental Health Conditions?

By Will Hall -- Cannabis (marijuana) is now legal in two states, legal for medical use in 23 more, and polls show the majority of Americans support legalization. As a counselor working with people diagnosed with psychosis and mental illness I am often asked about my clinical -- as well as my personal -- experience with medical cannabis. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Everyone is mentally ill

I think that instead of denying mental illness at the individual level (for some good reasons like lack of lab work indicating any sort of markers of any actual disease) it's time to recognize that everyone is mentally ill...and some of those most impacted are psychiatrists and other officials of the state who harm those of us who are more conscious...not less. Our society and world is sick...the individuals who are most sensitive are canaries in the coal mine. We all need help and we all need healing. Everyone on the planet needs to come to consciousness should we wish to save our species as well as a lot of others too. "It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society." - Jiddu Krishnamurti ... [click on title for the rest of the post]

Madness made me: “I made meaning, not in spite of my madness, but because of it”

Thanks to the reader on Facebook for sharing this nice short video documentary. Just 3 minutes of packed brilliance: "Down the end of the long polished corridor, Mary O'Hagan comes face to face with the condemning words written about her in her psychiatric files." ... (click title to view and read)

Radical uncertainty: a healing stance for all

By Ron Unger, LCSW -- Unfortunately, the typical interaction between professionals and clients seen as psychotic in our current mental health system has characteristics which make a positive human relationship almost impossible. To start with, rather than starting from a place of equality, where two people negotiate to see each other and to define reality, the professional holds onto a position of assumed superiority and declares himself or herself as able to define both the other person and the overall nature of reality, without any need to reconcile that view with the viewpoint of the “psychotic” person. This makes sense within the standard paradigm, as once a person’s mental process is defined as “psychotic” it is understood to be determined by illness, and to be senseless, with nothing of any value to offer. Under such circumstances, true dialogue, in which the experience of the professional meets the full experience of the other, is impossible. … [click on title to read and view more]

How antidepressants (and benzos) ruined my life: Luke Montagu

The UK Times Magazine today publishes a long article describing CEP founder Luke Montagu’s terrible experience with antidepressants and sleeping pills: "When he was first prescribed these drugs at 19, Montagu was not depressed and had never been diagnosed with depression. He was a student at New York University, and had recently undergone a general anaesthetic for a sinus operation that left him with headaches and feeling, as he puts it, “not myself”. Without carrying out any tests, a British GP announced that he had a “chemical imbalance of the limbic system” and prescribed Prozac. Montagu, “impressionable and in awe of doctors”, swallowed them unquestioningly … [click on title to read and view more]

The shamanic nature of consciousness

The biggest problem in our society now for those who get diagnosed with any sort of “psychosis,” is that they are most often met by professionals that do not even believe that healing can occur, let alone deep transformative growth. Deep transformative growth, could be the norm, if those claiming to be healers actually knew what was involved in the individuation journey. Meeting the dark underbelly of the psyche as those of us who have been labeled psychotic at one time or another is a calling and an act of heroism. One that is rarely encouraged in society. … June 2015 Sign up for: Shades of awakening: integrate and claim your gifts from spiritual emergency (often mistaken for psychosis) a free series of interviews coming up soon -- [click on title for the rest of the post]

The apex and decline of evidence-based psychotherapy and psychiatry

By Brent Potter, PhD -- I am grateful to be alive during to see the apex and decline of evidence-based psychotherapy and psychiatry. Honestly, I didn’t think that I’d see anything like it in my lifetime. It was looking pretty daunting for a while, but we’re not only making substantial progress, but winning. -- Please don’t mistake me—we have plenty more to do. We’re not in the clear yet, but we’re light years ahead of where we were roughly 20 years ago. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

CBT: Part of the Solution, Part of the Problem, an Illusion, or All of the Above?

Cognitive behavioral therapy or CBT has been pretty heavily criticized by people within the "alternatives" community and in particular by a number of Mad in America (MIA) bloggers and commenters in the past few years. In a way that isn’t surprising, because many of us are looking for radical change, and CBT often appears to be part of the establishment, especially within the therapy world.--But while I’m all for criticizing what’s wrong with CBT, especially with bad CBT, I think there’s also a danger in getting so caught up in pointing out real or imagined flaws that we fail to notice where CBT can be part of the solution, helping us move toward more humanistic and effective methods. I would propose that we instead attempt a “balanced approach,” noticing both where CBT is likely to help and where it is not, and discovering what can be done to build on the strengths of CBT while avoiding problems with the misapplication or overstated marketing of it. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

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