Understanding and Working With Psychosis (Part II of II)

by Joel Schwartz, PsyD — First and foremost, if psychosis is indeed a process of growth and reorganization following an initial breakdown, then the primary task of the therapist is not to cure or prevent the psychosis in the person, but accompany them through their transition into something else.

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my roots go down (on freedom during a time when so many are enslaved)

By Jen Peer Rich — This is not a revolution where we ask for equal rights, or we negotiate for freedom within the framework of dualism and dominance, this is a revolution in which freedom is experienced as a living reality, a reality that has simply been overlooked. Freedom is lived tacitly in the psyche. This quality of freedom is unbound, thus, the position of the dominator becomes irrelevant. It becomes forceless.

Rethinking Madness (book now offered FREE)

Rethinking Madness is a wonderful book I’ve written about several times here on Beyond Meds. Paris Williams, the author, is now offering the PDF file of the complete book for free. I highly recommend it. …

Sometimes things get weird

By Jen Peer Rich Sometimes our weirdest behaviors are actually the unspeakable expressions of grieving, healing and transformation happening inside. Energy always finds a way out. Waking up is full of recognitions that hurt. It’s sad to realize we’ve been victimized. It’s heartbreaking to realize we have been stretched into such painful dimensions by outside […]

The science of psychiatric medication discontinuation and reduction

By Laysha Ostrow This week Live & Learn launched a research study on the experience of people labeled with mental disorders who have tried to stop taking psychiatric medications. This project — the Psychiatric Medication Discontinuation/Reduction (PMDR) Study — aims to understand the process of coming off psychiatric medications in order to better support those who […]

Bridging the Benzo Divide: Iatrogenic Dependence and/or Addiction?

By Richard Lewis — As the benzodiazepine crisis spreads throughout the United States and other parts of the world so does the debate within the benzo victim/survivor community about important definitions of key medical terms and about safe and successful paths to healing and recovery. Does “iatrogenic benzo dependence” and “addiction” represent completely separate medical and social phenomena? If they are to have distinctly different scientific definitions, can they also (at the same time) intersect in multiple ways in people’s actual real life experience? And what is the medical and social significance of exploring these concepts and seeking unity of understanding and purpose? Before delving into the content of this debate let’s briefly review the social context from which this “Benzo Divide” has emerged.