In response to the NYTimes articles on antidepressant withdrawal

Some of us have been on the front lines figuring out this stuff years before anyone was publicly acknowledging it. I am sharing this info and collection in response to the two recent @nytimes articles. 

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What does it mean to heal?

Healing to me does not mean returning to what one was before something went wrong. Wholeness does not necessarily mean normal. And even the word recovery is problematic because, frankly, I don’t want what I had before. Who wants to go backwards anyway?

“How did this happen? You’re the most resourced person I know. “

“How did this happen? You’re the most resourced person I know. ” That was one of my friend’s response when they heard about what happened to me in December when I ended up in the ICU with the precipitous sodium drop (hyponatremia) that almost killed me.  It happened after I took a pharmaceutical for 3 days — the first pharmaceutical I’ve taken since I came off a massive cocktail of psych drugs 8 years ago. The above quoted question and sentence keeps coming back to me since, I too, have had my own version of that inquiry within.

Beyond withdrawal…

I see in retrospect that some core, vital part of me was always there during the drugged years, learning and remembering much that would help me in these years of coming off meds and now being med free. I no longer believe that I “lost” my life to drugs. This is, as Mary Oliver, puts it, my “one wild and precious life.”

Emotional “dysregulation” is plasticity

while the healing process may sometimes be radical and even violent as well as time consuming, ultimately when we’ve healed, we’ve also transformed in profound ways. Indeed, this is becoming my experience. …

Mindfulness in trauma flow

There is a concept of “flow” …or stream entry in Buddhism…when we are moving along with the energetics of NOW…we are in the moment and not burdened by future or past. It is the natural state of *being here now*. (to use Ram Dass’s terminology) I’m proposing (because I’ve experienced it) a sort of flow […]

Introducing the Mad Triangle: Identifying Trauma, Diversity, and Insight in Locations of Madness – by Chris Cole

Mad thinkers, movers, and shakers, as well as neurodivergent and marginalized folks of numerous locations, have shown me that what we think of as pathology exists in relationship—with ourselves, each other, and our environments. Ideas that psychopathology exists in the vacuum of one’s isolated experience only serves to silence discourse and marginalize divergent experiences.