Stranger *** (story from inside the psych ward)

By Steven Morgan – Tonight will be a Haldol night. The newly minted nurse will say, This is going to make you feel better, and I will duly reply, Ok, anything. She will tell me to lean forward over the table and pull up my gown. I will feel cold air crawl like fingers around my torso. She will tell me it’s going to feel like a prick, but only for a moment. I will feel the skin on my ass cinch around the needle. The tranquilizer will swim out the chute in a billowing yellow cloud. She will announce, Good job, jerking back. ….

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This is how we get locked up and forcibly drugged for no good reason

Woah, everyone who has never seen the cops (or mental illness professionals) out of control for no good reason whatsoever should watch this. Yeah, this is like what happens to us when they don’t understand our altered states as well…things just start happening and it’s all out of your control. Next thing you know you’re in four point restraints and they’re shooting you up with drugs to shut you up and disable you. Literally. People have no idea unless it’s happened to them. It’s ugly, it’s violent, it’s traumatic. (video included)

Perceived madness will unleash unprovoked violence (violation) by cops, authorities etc.

I don’t spend so much time thinking about this stuff anymore, but as a writer I’ve found that there are many people who need to hear this from someone else because they think they’re the only ones such heinous shit happened to. Or worse, they have come to believe they deserved the heinous shit because there is no one in their environment to reflect to them their real beauty and any sort of belief in their inherent well-being (we all have that).

Bridging the Benzo Divide: Iatrogenic Dependence and/or Addiction?

By Richard Lewis — As the benzodiazepine crisis spreads throughout the United States and other parts of the world so does the debate within the benzo victim/survivor community about important definitions of key medical terms and about safe and successful paths to healing and recovery. Does “iatrogenic benzo dependence” and “addiction” represent completely separate medical and social phenomena? If they are to have distinctly different scientific definitions, can they also (at the same time) intersect in multiple ways in people’s actual real life experience? And what is the medical and social significance of exploring these concepts and seeking unity of understanding and purpose? Before delving into the content of this debate let’s briefly review the social context from which this “Benzo Divide” has emerged.

Marijuana for Mental Health Conditions?

By Will Hall — Cannabis (marijuana) is now legal in two states, legal for medical use in 23 more, and polls show the majority of Americans support legalization. As a counselor working with people diagnosed with psychosis and mental illness I am often asked about my clinical — as well as my personal — experience with medical cannabis. … [click on title for the rest of the post]