Robert Whitaker on Psychiatric Drugs (interview CBC Radio)

Robert Whitaker has argued for years that millions of the people who are prescribed those drugs derive no benefit from them. And in fact, the drugs may make their illness worse. Mr. Whitaker's criticisms were controversial when he published his research in a 2010 book calledAnatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America. That book, though, won the 2010 Investigative Reporters and Editors Book Award, and since its publication, an increasing number of psychiatric researchers have come to agree with his conclusions. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Musings on that which gets called mental illness. What is it really?

There is often a debate that goes on between those who embrace psychiatry and those who are critical of it…and everyone in-between for that matter too…as to whether or not mental illness is real. The spectrum of where one stands on the issue of psychiatry is really very broad and diverse though people like to believe it’s always an either/or proposition. Little in life is that black and white even if it’s easier to imagine it to be the case. So. Mental illness. Is it real? … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Awaken the inner shaman

What the Inner Shaman is and how we can access it through practice and surrender. Jose explores shamanic ways of seeing, relating to your body, and actualizing your potential. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Epic Fail: The Legislation of Involuntary Mental Health Treatment

The bill, as many people who follow what’s happening in mental health law know, calls for the enactment of assisted (involuntary) outpatient commitment laws at the Federal level and is purportedly crafted to ensure the safety of those deemed “severely mentally ill” by giving families, courts and mental health providers increased authority to commit individuals to outpatient treatment. This may involve supervisory case management and compulsory treatment with whatever psychiatric drugs may be prescribed, while also granting family members or guardians the legal right to access an individual’s medical records. This legislation, were it to pass, would divert funds from recovery-oriented community mental health programs and would expand funding for psychiatric drug treatment, while also undermining existing legislation relating to patients’ rights. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

The pharmaceutical industry and the fight against gun control

by PAUL WOODWARD In the 1980s and ’90s, the psychiatric system went through a major transformation as psychiatric medication replaced psychotherapy as the standard of care. This broadened the scope of psychiatry in two ways. With patient care being reduced to medication management, doctors could see more patients. And with a massive growth in the number of Americans receiving disability for mental illness, the market for psychiatric medication has been booming, thanks in part to Medicaid funding. The pharmaceutical industry has only one interest: selling drugs. It can reasonably be described as the most successful form of organized crime in human history. When companies repeatedly pay billions of dollars in settlements, it is clear that they regard such settlements as simply a component in the operating costs. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Psychiatric labels and the bigotry/prejudice attached to them

I get really tired of the stickiness of psychiatric labels. In spite of the fact that they are used inappropriately all the time, once people are labeled it's very hard to lose the label and the bigotry and prejudice that accompanies the label. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Mental illness: five hard questions

The questions are: Is there an 'epidemic' of mental disorder? Does the path to understanding mental disorder lie through the brain? What is the role of diagnosis and of diagnostic manuals? Should we seek early identification of those at risk of future mental pathology? What is the place of patients, users, survivors, consumers in the mental health system? … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Important souls (let us recognize trauma in the lives of those who are called mentally ill)

When we start listening to people’s stories of pain rather than numbing them out and effectively silencing them with neurotoxic drugs we will start healing them. Until then people will remain broken. One of the most basic needs for a wounded human being to heal is to be seen. Recognized. Validated. Yes. … [click title for link]

Letter: PsychRights to Vice Pres Biden re: misguided, dangerous focus on identifying & forcing “treatment” on people labeled mentally ill

In the wake of the unimaginable tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School, there has been an understandable assumption that increased use of mental health services and a mental registry is part of the solution. Understandable, but wrong.

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