Physical punishment (spanking etc) actually alters the brain

Researchers say physical punishment actually alters the brain — not only in an “I’m traumatized” kind of way but also in an “I literally have less gray matter in my brain” kind of way.

“Exposing children to HCP (harsh corporal punishment) may have detrimental effects on trajectories of brain development,” one 2009 study concluded.

Harsh corporal punishment in the study was defined as at least one spanking a month for more than three years, frequently done with objects such as a belt or paddle. Researchers found children who were regularly spanked had less gray matter in certain areas of the prefrontal cortex that have been linked to depression, addiction and other mental health disorders, the study authors say. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

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Spanking is linked to serious child behavior problems (STOP IT)

Two new studies show that providing parents with information that spanking can lead to short- and long-term child behavior problems may help to change parents’ opinion on this form of discipline.

Parents who spank their children often believe it’s an effective form of punishment. Research has found that parents who spank believe spanking can make children behave or respect them.

That belief drives parental behavior, more so than their level of anger, the seriousness of the child’s misbehavior or the parent’s perceived intent of the child’s misbehavior.

However, decades of research studies have found that spanking is linked to short- and long-term child behavior problems. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

The Thing Is

The Thing Is to love life, to love it even when you have no stomach for it and everything you’ve held dear crumbles like burnt paper in your hands, your throat filled with the silt of it. When grief sits with you, its tropical heat thickening the air, heavy as water more fit for gills […]

WOW!!! Vatican to hear debate about psychiatric drugs for kids

Robert Whitaker, Irving Kirsch, Joanna Moncrieff, Pat Bracken, Giovanni Fava, Jaakko Seikkula and others are to participate in a June 14-15 conference, hosted by the Vatican, that will examine the evidence for (and against) the rise of psychiatric medication and fall of psychosocial treatment for children.

Press release for the June 13 press conference associated with the event: … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Learned behavior, not genetics is the root of much so called mental-illness: yes!

A year later, the kids who had been identified with “emotional dysregulation” — and whose parents had changed their own behaviors as a result of participating in the Incredible Years program – had fewer angry outbursts and irascible behavior problems. The researchers wrote: “Parent interviews revealed that compared with controls, intervention parents were warmer, less critical, used more play, praise, and less harsh discipline (spanking and prolonged exclusion) at follow up.”

Note that there’s no labeling of “good” parents and “bad” parents here. More often than not, parents with children who are angry, depressed, anxious or moody aren’t “bad” parents. They’re modeling behavior that they learned from their own parents, and if they don’t make a conscious effort to change or aren’t taught skills that help them alter their interactions with their children, they pass on their own childhood adversities, especially if they’re under stress. … [click on title to read the rest]

To This Day: the profound and lasting impact that bullying can have, shared with BEAUTY

To This Day Project is a project based on a spoken word poem written by Shane Koyczan (shanekoyczan.com) called “To This Day”, to further explore the profound and lasting impact that bullying can have on an individual.

Schools and families are in desperate need of proper tools to confront this problem. We can give them a starting point… A message that will have a far reaching and long lasting effect in confronting bullying. … [click on title to read the rest]

Newborn infants experience psychiatric drug withdrawal

This is something I posted before and I’m posting it again because it’s really a deeply atrocious thing to consider. Imagine entering the world for the first time and being welcomed by agonizing drug withdrawal symptoms. An infant would have no way to intellectually interpret such hell.

Believe me when adults have severe withdrawal issues, we don’t have any way of intellectually interpreting such hell either. It’s a nightmare. People like to dismiss infant experience as though it doesn’t matter, but the more we learn about trauma and those who suffer from PTSD it becomes more and more clear that infant and childhood traumas do indeed effect the entire life of many individuals.