The Raising of America: let’s give our kids what they need

Science has demonstrated that a child’s experiences during the earliest years are vital to building the foundation for life-long individual success — in school and in life.

Now economists are studying the costs and benefits of high quality early care and preschool. And they’re worried. Not because we’re spending too much but because we’re spending too little where it matters most. …Preventing trauma and abuse in kids and supporting them in meaningful ways as they grow up should be a critical priority … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Meditation for Kids: Books, Articles and Other Resources

Let’s start encouraging and teaching good habits while our children are young.

From Mommy Mystic, a resource guide for kids.
I am frequently asked about meditation resources for kids, so here is a compilation of the best resources I have found. First, are books you can read to your kids, and then books you can use to learn how to teach them meditation, as a parent or teacher. Note that these books are all geared for pre-teen children (perhaps I will create a list for teenagers someday.) After the book lists are some articles about research on children’s meditation, as well as meditation programs in schools. Finally, I have included a list of organizations currently teaching meditation in schools and other settings. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

WOW!!! Vatican to hear debate about psychiatric drugs for kids

Robert Whitaker, Irving Kirsch, Joanna Moncrieff, Pat Bracken, Giovanni Fava, Jaakko Seikkula and others are to participate in a June 14-15 conference, hosted by the Vatican, that will examine the evidence for (and against) the rise of psychiatric medication and fall of psychosocial treatment for children.

Press release for the June 13 press conference associated with the event: … [click on title for the rest of the post]

More: Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (trauma in childhood associated with many later problems, including that which gets labeled mental illness)

The CDC’s ACE Study summarized in 14-minute video from Academy on Violence & Abuse
The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACE Study) is the product of collaboration between Vincent J. Felitti, MD, who founded and directed the Preventive Medicine Department at Kaiser Permanente in San Diego, CA, and Robert F. Anda, MD, MS of the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who designed, analyzed the data and prepared numerous scientific publications from the ACE Study. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Learned behavior, not genetics is the root of much so called mental-illness: yes!

A year later, the kids who had been identified with “emotional dysregulation” — and whose parents had changed their own behaviors as a result of participating in the Incredible Years program – had fewer angry outbursts and irascible behavior problems. The researchers wrote: “Parent interviews revealed that compared with controls, intervention parents were warmer, less critical, used more play, praise, and less harsh discipline (spanking and prolonged exclusion) at follow up.”

Note that there’s no labeling of “good” parents and “bad” parents here. More often than not, parents with children who are angry, depressed, anxious or moody aren’t “bad” parents. They’re modeling behavior that they learned from their own parents, and if they don’t make a conscious effort to change or aren’t taught skills that help them alter their interactions with their children, they pass on their own childhood adversities, especially if they’re under stress. … [click on title to read the rest]

To This Day: the profound and lasting impact that bullying can have, shared with BEAUTY

To This Day Project is a project based on a spoken word poem written by Shane Koyczan (shanekoyczan.com) called “To This Day”, to further explore the profound and lasting impact that bullying can have on an individual.

Schools and families are in desperate need of proper tools to confront this problem. We can give them a starting point… A message that will have a far reaching and long lasting effect in confronting bullying. … [click on title to read the rest]

Newborn infants experience psychiatric drug withdrawal

This is something I posted before and I’m posting it again because it’s really a deeply atrocious thing to consider. Imagine entering the world for the first time and being welcomed by agonizing drug withdrawal symptoms. An infant would have no way to intellectually interpret such hell.

Believe me when adults have severe withdrawal issues, we don’t have any way of intellectually interpreting such hell either. It’s a nightmare. People like to dismiss infant experience as though it doesn’t matter, but the more we learn about trauma and those who suffer from PTSD it becomes more and more clear that infant and childhood traumas do indeed effect the entire life of many individuals.