Talking about suicide, suicidal feelings and the desire to die. It’s healthy — Suicide prevention day

Below is a collection of links in which suicide and suicidal feelings and/or the desire to die are explored. We need places where people can openly talk about suicide and death and dying so they can stare it in the face, hold it, feel it and come to their own conclusions.

Everyone should have a safe place for this deep work. Despair generally disappears in the light of day but if people aren’t allowed this process and instead locked up and put on drugs that suppress and stop the process of healing one cannot move through these states. Given such safe places are not available most of the time for most people, many find they have no choice but to choose suppressive means (drugs and hospitals) at this point. Because there are no viable options quite often this is a reasonable choice for many and must also be respected.¬† ¬†We do need to change this status quo if we want to allow for profound growth and healing as well as simple self-determination.

While pharmaceuticals may help some folks some of the time, those of us who know we do not do well on such substances need to be respected and allowed to heal in safe situations otherwise we are retraumatized.

Right now, mostly, we are creating these places in our own private lives. That’s not enough. People everywhere need these safe places so that new possibilities might be made known to folks who’ve never even considered options because they’ve never heard of them in contexts that felt safe.

Let us find the will and the right communities and networks that many such safe places will be available for everyone regardless of social and financial status. Let us make it happen.¬† We are in the midst of a time where these ideas are beginning to take root. We can keep holding the vision and sharing what we know from our own experience. We need to listen too. Everyone’s perception of their own reality is important and must be considered seriously when we meet them. Respecting those we don’t agree with is also important. Everyone with labels have been traumatized and hearing their experience from their perspective is critical to allowing the healing process regardless of whether pharmaceuticals are in the picture or not.

These are a couple of new pieces…the link is followed by a brief excerpt:

  • When suicide ceases to be taboo there will be less¬†suicide¬†— “We can all start working with our issues around death, too. That‚Äôs a place to start with ourselves so that we might be able to offer better support. We can start that right now. I‚Äôve worked in hospice and with the death and dying off and on most of my career. It‚Äôs a very good thing to get familiar with the idea and the fact that we all die and that life is a mystery that no one understands. From that place we can start to more meaningfully grapple with the pain of one feeling like it‚Äôs time to die. We‚Äôre all in this together really. Grappling with the mystery and learning to be okay in the chaos and pain that is life.”
  • Suicidal thoughts are treated like a crime: that‚Äôs why people don‚Äôt seek¬†help. “A system that criminalizes pain rather than supporting that person with love is sick.It‚Äôs not rational or sane to forcibly lock people up while they‚Äôre in their deepest despair. It‚Äôs not help and to call it help is double speak. It‚Äôs also a sort of gas-lighting experience to be told that you‚Äôre getting help while you are losing your freedoms. True service: recognizing every human being as peer.”

this year I lost a dear friend. I share this in loving memory:

More on this topic from Beyond Meds:

‚óŹ ¬†DIVINE SUICIDE: Depressive Breakdown as a Call to¬†Awakening¬†‚Äď ‚ÄúI have seen far too many people in the care of social services and standard mental health care grossly retraumatized rather than helped when feeling their most vulnerable because people do not understand this loving, accepting and healing approach. It‚Äôs based in deep trust for the process of the individual who presents themselves in front of you. Listen. Love.‚ÄĚ

‚óŹ ¬†A conversation about¬†suicide¬†‚Äď ‚ÄúThis conversation in the below video with Adyashanti is so refreshing. It‚Äôs absolutely true that those who are suicidal are all too often met with terror and control. Most people who feel suicidal need to talk about it. Approaching people with love and openness means NOT being terrified of that persons dark places. And not reacting in a knee-jerk and controlling manner. That has never allowed anyone to feel safe to open up about the painful vulnerability they are most assuredly experiencing when feeling suicidal.‚ÄĚ

‚óŹ ¬†Six Ways You Can Really Help Prevent¬†Suicide¬†‚Äď by Leah Harris ‚ÄúI tried to kill myself when I was 14. It wasn‚Äôt the first time. My psychiatrist had just upped my Prozac, a whole lot of unresolved early childhood trauma had flared up at puberty, and the baseline sadness and confusion I felt mushroomed into an overwhelming desire to die. The thoughts wouldn‚Äôt leave me alone: Everything I could think of circled back only to suicide. I wrote out a suicide note and made an attempt.¬†¬†I won‚Äôt go into the horrors of waking up alive in an emergency room where the staff was clearly annoyed they had to deal with me and my ‚Äúattention seeking‚ÄĚ behavior.‚ÄĚ

‚óŹ ¬†Suicide Prevention for All: Making the World a Safer Place to Be¬†Human¬† ‚Äď Leah Harris

‚óŹ ¬†Living with suicidal¬†feelings¬† ‚ÄĒ By Will Hall ‚ÄúIt‚Äôs time for a new understanding of suicidal feelings.¬†Is it really best to force someone into the hospital when they are suicidal? Do suicidal feelings plus ‚Äúrisk factors‚ÄĚ really mean professionals can predict whether someone might try to kill themselves? And are suicidal feelings the symptom of a treatable illness that should include medication prescription?‚ÄĚ

‚óŹ ¬†A suicide prevention poster from the Icarus¬†Project¬†‚Äď ‚ÄúMost of the suicide-prevention posters I‚Äôve seen (admittedly not that many ‚Äď the topic is still pretty taboo in our society), are aimed solely at the loved ones and close friends of the person in danger.¬† How to recognize the signs of suicidality, who to call, etc.¬† Somewhat helpful, I guess, but shouldn‚Äôt we be addressing, in some way,¬†the person who is actually considering this extreme action?¬† It‚Äôs as if the assumption is that person is beyond reason, beyond understanding (if you want to get explicit about it, not really¬†human¬†anymore), so there‚Äôs no point talking to¬†him.‚ÄĚ

‚óŹ ¬†Many psychiatric symptoms remit upon drug withdrawal ‚Äď including suicidal¬†impulses¬†‚Äď ¬†‚ÄĚSomething that comes up quite often in discussions with my friends and readers who have been on meds and have come off of them is how many of the ‚Äúpsychiatric‚ÄĚ symptoms they were being ‚Äútreated‚ÄĚ for disappear upon discontinuation of the medications. This is widely known and experienced among those of us who have decided to stop medicating ourselves.‚ÄĚ (**warning¬†‚Äď rapid or cold-turkey withdrawal can often inflame psychiatric symptoms (including feelings of hurting oneself) for some time. For¬†safer withdrawal practices see here.)

‚óŹ ¬†Psychiatric Drugs as Agents of Trauma ‚ÄĒ ‚ÄúDrug Stress Trauma¬†Syndrome‚Ä̬†‚Äď ¬†‚ÄĚThis article is written by Charles Whitfield, MD, a psychiatrist, who has recognized the trauma these drugs can create for a very long time. It‚Äôs clearly an important read.‚ÄĚ

‚óŹ ¬†A video with Will Hall on this subject:¬†On suicidal thoughts

***

For a multitude of ideas about how to create a life filled with safe alternatives to psychiatric drugs visit the drop-down menus at the top of this page or scroll down the homepage for more recent postings. 

Support Everything Matters: Beyond Meds. Make a donation with PayPal or Enter Amazon via a link from this blog and do the shopping you’d be doing anyway. No need to purchase the book the link takes you to. Thank you!

Joel Marcus, MD – the psychiatrist who drugged me into a toxic stupor (Berkeley, CA)

In the spirit of #METOO enough is enough. Psychiatry has destroyed my life far worse than the two times I have been raped. (I don’t speak for everyone, but that is true for me.)¬† The fact is many lives have been harmed by psychiatry.¬† Too many people have been abused, sickened, disabled (and died too) by psychiatry and no one takes responsibility for it and most of society refuses to acknowledge it’s happening. It’s time to end such treatment and trauma. Psychiatric drugs cover up pre-existing trauma and then deeply ingrain that trauma into the nervous system effectively becoming a brain injury. It becomes impossible to work through any of it at all if we remain on the drugs. (see: Psychiatric drugs are agents of trauma)

I don’t actually¬† have hard feelings for this man in particular, Joel Marcus, MD. I liked him. It’s been many years since I’ve seen or talked to him. He’s simply the man who harmed me in the way that all of psychiatry harms people everyday and doesn’t own up to it. I think getting personal about this stuff is appropriate at some point. I want to know that my experience will help others never have to go through what I and the many thousands of people I advocate for have had to go through. While it’s personal on one level, more importantly, Joel Marcus is every psychiatrist and all psychiatrists have to own what has been done in the name of their profession.

This action is that we might raise awareness with the hope that he and others like him can come to peace with what he’s participated in while first taking responsibility. The first step is to acknowledge that his practice harms people. And this post will come to his attention because people like me who are researching their doctor will find it and have some questions. It will help some folks come to this information so that they might make better educated choices than those I and those I advocate for were ever able to make.

Joel Marcus is¬† both a neurologist and a psychiatrist. This is, of course, additionally horrifying since what many who have iatrogenic psych drug injuries are suffering from are, indeed, drug-induced brain injuries.¬†He’s also well-regarded and respected (as well as a likable guy which makes it additionally tricky for those meeting him and wanting to question psychiatry — which I did at the time.) He had me on a cocktail of 6 drugs mostly all at the very highest doses by the end of the time I was subjected to his toxic care. This too, is horrifying. The heinous, dangerous, toxic care I got is standard treatment in psychiatry. I was treated before the internet existed and didn’t have any sources of alternative information, though I tried.

So, I’ve never outed this MD who “treated” me for the bulk of the time I was over-drugged although I’ve mentioned him many times over the years. I decided to out him now since he’s never acknowledged the toxicity and dangerousness of these drugs even though I’ve communicated with him for many years, hoping to get some acknowledgment and perhaps help those whom he still drugs. It seems reasonable to hold every psychiatrist responsible for those they’ve harmed and he’s the only one I can call out. Other psychiatrists might start thinking twice if this becomes something that many people do. Creating change and rising up from oppressive societal forces is always a bumpy process.

I’ve written to him many times and have¬† some of the emails documented on this page:

Most of them have been completely ignored and are not documented on this site.

He can now answer to anyone who sees this post and explain why he had me on this monstrously large cocktail that almost killed me multiple times now (that’s not hyperbole). Perhaps, occasionally, someone will walk away realizing that there are choices that these doctors never let us know about. Informed choice remains the thrust of my work. No one should have to find out, somewhere down the line, that these drugs kill and disable with some frequency.

the cocktail:

  • 84 mg of Concerta
  • 50 mg of Seroquel
  • 200 mg of Zoloft
  • 400 mg of Lamictal
  • 11 mg of Risperdal
  • 3 to 6 mg of Klonopin (3 daily and then up to 6 PRN)

While this sort of excessive prescribing happens there is actually no evidence base anywhere in the medical literature that would support such polypharmacy at such high doses.¬† To be clear, psych drugs can harm at any dose. ¬†Robert Whitaker’s books on psychiatry¬† thoroughly examines the evidence base.

For more history see also:

And on David Healy, MD’s site (a psychiatrist who understands the toxic nature of these drugs) :¬†The ‘grave disability’ of withdrawal syndrome | RxISK

And on Mad in America: Everything Matters: a Memoir From Before, During and After Psychiatric Drugs РMad In America

Sites to learn about the toxicity of these drugs:

Some additional links of interest here

And here are some books to get started with too if this is new information for you.

And again,¬†Robert Whitaker’s books on psychiatry¬† thoroughly examine the evidence base.

***

*it is potentially dangerous to come off medications without careful planning. Please be sure to be well-educated before undertaking any sort of discontinuation of medications. If your MD agrees to help you do so, do not assume they know how to do it well even if they claim to have experience. They are generally not trained in discontinuation and may not know how to recognize withdrawal issues. A lot of withdrawal issues are misdiagnosed to be psychiatric problems. This is why it’s good to educate oneself and find a doctor who is willing to learn with you as your partner in care. ¬†Really all¬†doctors should always be willing to do this as we are all individuals and need to be treated as such. See:¬†Psychiatric drug withdrawal and protracted withdrawal syndrome¬†round-up

It’s become clear to me that whenever it’s possible that it’s helpful for folks who’ve not begun withdrawal and have the time to consider a carefully thought out plan to attempt to bring greater well-being to your body before starting the withdrawal. That means learning how to profoundly nourish your body/mind and spirit prior to beginning a withdrawal. For suggestions on how to go about doing that check the drop-down menus on this blog for ideas. Anything that helps you learn how to live well can be part of your plan. That plan will look different for everyone as we learn to follow our hearts and find our own unique paths in the world. Things to begin considering are diet, exercise and movement, meditation/contemplation etc. Paying attention to all these things as you do them helps too. The body will start letting us know what it needs as we learn to pay attention. 

For a multitude of ideas about how to create a life filled with safe alternatives to psychiatric drugs visit the drop-down menus at the top of this page or scroll down the homepage for more recent postings. 

Psych drugs harm. Let’s get high profile MDs and celebrities – spreading the message

There are quite a few relatively mainstream doctors now talking about the harms of benzodiazepines and anti-depressants on social media. As usual other psychiatric drugs (neuroleptics, anti-convulsants, — called anti-psychotics and mood stabilizers, etc) are given short shrift.

This is about informed consent. If people don’t know about the very serious potential risks involved in chronic use of these drugs, they cannot make a reasonable choice. Short-term targeted use in crisis is a whole different ball-game than being on them for life which is what is generally recommended for many people.

Allen Francis MD¬†who was chair of the DSM-IV Task Force and is currently professor emeritus at Duke is one of them. He’s talking mostly about benzos lately on twitter and touches a bit on anti-depressants and poly-drugging in a vague sort of way.

I said to him  (also via twitter):

note: If you have a twitter account *like* and *retweet* this to Allen Francis and join the conversation. 

Please speak to the dangerousness of chronic use of ALL psych drugs. All psych drugs harm but those taking heavier hitting drugs like neuroleptics (and cocktails with multiple drugs) are being left out of the conversation. Those drugs routinely kill and little is said about it.

Zyprexa, for example has killed more people than Vioxx ever did and it continues to kill daily – Vioxx was removed from market but Zyprexa has not been. Why? Because those labeled crazy are considered expendable. The risk is considered worth it. I say bullshit.

In 2008 … this was already true…now deaths have likely doubled or tripled…come on people this is insanity. Those being treated, not so insane.
FDA Finds Zyprexa Has Killed 3,400 People, Worse Than Vioxx¬†—Zyprexa has killed more people than Vioxx ever did

Benzodiazepines as well as all psych drugs are potentially highly toxic and deadly. Please let us be inclusive and help everyone who is being prescribed dangerous drugs in the name of medicine. If medicine doesn’t heal, can it really be called medicine? I think not.

Again: If you have a twitter account *like* and *retweet* this to Allen Francis and join the conversation. 

Oh, Marianne Williamson is getting on it too and she has a large audience that reaches a lot of mainstream folks…I tweeted to her too but twitter search isn’t so good so I can’t find that tweet…here is one to support her on. We need to help her understand about all the other psych drugs too.

 

***

*it is potentially dangerous to come off medications without careful planning. Please be sure to be well educated before undertaking any sort of discontinuation of medications. If your MD agrees to help you do so, do not assume they know how to do it well even if they claim to have experience. They are generally not trained in discontinuation and may not know how to recognize withdrawal issues. A lot of withdrawal issues are misdiagnosed to be psychiatric problems. This is why it’s good to educate oneself and find a doctor who is willing to learn with you as your partner in care. ¬†Really all¬†doctors should always be willing to do this as we are all individuals and need to be treated as such. See:¬†Psychiatric drug withdrawal and protracted withdrawal syndrome¬†round-up

It’s become clear to me that whenever it’s possible that it’s helpful for folks who’ve not begun withdrawal and have the time to consider a carefully thought out plan to attempt to bring greater well-being to your body before starting the withdrawal. That means learning how to profoundly nourish your body/mind and spirit prior to beginning a withdrawal. For suggestions on how to go about doing that check the drop-down menus on this blog for ideas. Anything that helps you learn how to live well can be part of your plan. That plan will look different for everyone as we learn to follow our hearts and find our own unique paths in the world. Things to begin considering are diet, exercise and movement, meditation/contemplation etc. Paying attention to all these things as you do them helps too. The body will start letting us know what it needs as we learn to pay attention. 

For a multitude of ideas about how to create a life filled with safe alternatives to psychiatric drugs visit the drop-down menus at the top of this page or scroll down the homepage for more recent postings. 

Support Everything Matters: Beyond Meds. Make a donation with PayPal or Enter Amazon via a link from this blog and do the shopping you’d be doing anyway. No need to purchase the book the link takes you to. Thank you!

 

In response to the NYTimes articles on antidepressant withdrawal

Update: Some of us have been on the front lines figuring out this stuff years before anyone was publicly acknowledging it. I am sharing this info and collection in response to the two recent New York Times articles:

Many People Taking Antidepressants Discover They Cannot Quit¬†‚Äď The New York Times
Antidepressants and Withdrawal: Readers Tell Their Stories¬†‚Äď The New York Times

This post includes a collection of links to additional information about antidepressants and antidepressant withdrawal. This is a repost with a collection of articles that have been posted over the 11 year period that Everything Matters: Beyond Meds has been documenting the difficulty people discover coming off all psych meds, including antidepressants.

Dr. Joanna Moncrieff, psychiatrist and senior lecturer, University College London:

 

hat tip to CEP

Books by Joanna Moncrieff here.

And below I’m cutting and pasting the Beyond Meds page on antidepressants.¬†You can always find the most updated version of this¬†from the navigation drop-down menus at the top of the blog:

Antidepressant info

Scroll down for collection of additional links to antidepressant info posts

This post will find a home in the navigation menu at the top of the page since it’s another post that brings together many articles on SSRIs. I’ll update it as appropriate.

This is what I wrote about SSRIs and the same can be said for SNRIs too, really:

To refer to SSRIs as no better than placebo is misleading because while it’s technically true in clinical trials — SSRIs are also very different than placebos…they are NOT inert…they are very active and they make EVERYONE feel differently.

People who are very depressed like to feel differently. Different can sometimes feel better even if only for a while. Sometimes different feels much better and sometimes different feels really bad and even dangerous (think homicidal and suicidal–SSRIs are associated with both).

They are not inert and they will act in all manner of ways in different people. And, then of course, yeah, they also cause iatrogenic damageoften severe

So I think the placebo line is overused and extremely misleading….it makes it sound like SSRIs do nothing at all which is absolutely not true. They are potent psychoactive and neurotoxic drugs.

Info on SSRIs from Beyond Meds (not an exhaustive list of info):

Do people recover and thrive after being told they cannot by psychiatry? Yes we do. All the time.

*it is potentially dangerous to come off medications without careful planning. Please be sure to be well educated before undertaking any sort of discontinuation of medications. If your MD agrees to help you do so, do not assume they know how to do it well even if they claim to have experience. They are generally not trained in discontinuation and may not know how to recognize withdrawal issues. A lot of withdrawal issues are misdiagnosed to be psychiatric problems. This is why it’s good to educate oneself and find a doctor who is willing to learn with you as your partner in care. ¬†Really all¬†doctors should always be willing to do this as we are all individuals and need to be treated as such. See:¬†Psychiatric drug withdrawal and protracted withdrawal syndrome¬†round-up

For a multitude of ideas about how to create a life filled with safe alternatives to psychiatric drugs visit the drop-down menus at the top of this page or scroll down the homepage for more recent postings. 

Support Everything Matters: Beyond Meds. Make a donation with PayPal or Enter Amazon via a link from this blog and do the shopping you’d be doing anyway. No need to purchase the book the link takes you to. Thank you!

Beyond withdrawal…

This is a repost from 2015

This is a rework of some of my previous work¬†for a small publication. It will be mostly familiar to long-time readers. I’m republishing here now since it’s somewhat different from previous pieces I’ve written. It’s also additionally edited for this posting.

After approximately two decades on psych meds I came off a six drug cocktail in about six years. This proved to be a gargantuan task and left me gravely disabled.

I see in retrospect that some core, vital part of me was always there during the drugged years, learning and remembering much that would help me in these years of coming off meds and now being med free. I no longer believe that I ‚Äúlost‚ÄĚ my life to drugs. This is, as Mary Oliver, puts it, my¬†“one wild and precious life.”

Yes, this is it¬†and so I celebrate it.¬†I do think that it‚Äôs sad¬†that I could not be more conscious during those years and that my body became toxic,¬†polluted and chronically, painfully ill; and this is why I help others learn to avoid what happened to me. I’m highly motivated to help others avoid extreme suffering and so¬†my experience is not lost; in fact it was stored in my body to be processed when I got free of drugs. This is what trauma does. The body keeps the score. It’s all there and really cannot be lost. This is one of the many ways that¬†psych drugs act additionally as¬†agents of trauma.¬† Part of the healing process, for me, and clearly many others who‚Äôve been on psych meds and come off, is one of working through layers and layers of trauma ‚ÄĒ that which was incurred prior to psych drug use as well as¬†that which is incurred as a result of psych drug use¬†and exposure to the dehumanizing psychiatric system. I have done this mostly through self-enquiry, meditation, yoga and ecstatic dance. Trauma becomes embodied.¬†Embodied practices have proven very important for me.

Nothing to do but feel, feel, feel…such is the peeling and healing of the trauma onion…

It is a job of sorts, to do this unpeeling, and we do it as much for ourselves as we do it for each other. This is a community effort of healing happening among everyone brave enough to face the pain of our lifetimes. This is the work of being human.

As many readers know, the process of drug withdrawal made me much sicker before I began to find wellness. I was one of thousands of people who develop serious protracted withdrawal issues that lead to grave disability. Still, I have not had one moment of regret for having freed myself from these drugs because my mind is clear. I have a clarity of mind that is so beautiful I cry in contemplation. My clarity was stolen from me for almost half my life. I have it back and even while gravely impaired I was grateful for that.

 

My healing journey has entailed learning about our deeply holistic natures as human beings. EVERYTHING matters. The body you were born with. The body you have today. Your relationships with others and the planet, the food you eat, and the air you breath…. how often you move your body and the thoughts you nurture in your mind and soul.

That is what understanding ourselves as holistic beings entails. Understanding our relationship to EVERYTHING in our environment, and our bodies, what we’re born with and also social and political phenomena and then how it’s all connected.  We are all of it. Embodied.

So, by that slow and painstaking, but ultimately joyous process of coming to understand how everything matters, I’ve been healing and bringing back well-being to this body/mind/spirit.

We need each other in this process. Building non-coercive healing community is the most important thing to me these days. Community comes in many different guises and does not require giving up your autonomy and self-determination. Psychiatry and the mental illness establishment often steals both. I envision a world where people are empowered to make the choices that work for them in the context of their lives. Everyone’s path is going to be different. Respecting and celebrating that great diversity is key.

Below is a collection of links which contain many links to reconsider and reframe our experiences that otherwise get labeled mentally ill so that we might heal and transform and thrive.

See also

Chronic illness

My “chronically ill” body rewards my gentle persistent attentions with never-ending insights into the nature of being an embodied human. Healing is alchemy and it never ends. The sensitive body holds the entire world’s pain, trauma, joy and madness within it. And yes, the suggestion is that most of us are not embodied. The conditioned self is disembodied. Coming to embodiment can be very painful.

***

See also:

Perhaps also of interest:

***

For a multitude of ideas about how to create a life filled with safe alternatives to psychiatric drugs visit the drop-down menus at the top of this page or scroll down the homepage for more recent postings. 

Support Beyond Meds. Enter Amazon via a link from this blog and do the shopping you’d be doing anyway. No need to purchase the book the link takes you to or make a donation with PayPal. Thank you!

 

Romanticizing mental illness (a straw man argument)

Someone on social media responded to yesterday’s article (see:¬†Language of mental illness ‚Äúothers‚ÄĚ people: it‚Äôs a human rights violation. Wake¬†up) with a comment saying that I romanticize mental illness. It’s a very easy way to avoid the serious implications of what is actually being said in the article. People use it all the time. It’s an empty deflection. My response to that is below. I want to point out that the very first thing this guy does is legitimize, once again, the term mental illness by using it as though I was speaking of such a distinct reality in a separate group of people which the entire article refutes. There is nothing romantic about the condition of humanity right now. We are on the brink of destroying ourselves. Wake up!

The response:

A favorite way to dismiss those of us who find transformative healing via what gets called “mental illness: they say we “romanticize” it… As though our process is a piece of cake and we know shit all about moving through such hell realms. They want to pretend that those of us who heal don’t exist. One more cruelty. One more negation on a path in which all of society spits on us the whole way through to wholeness…

We cannot win. Becoming conscious is truly risky business when we have all of society spewing this sort of stuff at us. We feel it all. We have to disentangle ourselves from it all.

***

For a multitude of ideas about how to create safe alternatives to psychiatric drugs visit the drop-down menus at the top of this page. 

Support Beyond Meds. Enter Amazon via a link from this blog and do the shopping you’d be doing anyway. No need to purchase the book the link takes you to. THANK YOU or make a donation with PayPal

Language of mental illness “others” people: it’s a human rights violation. Wake up.

To separate out the sensitive and call them mentally ill is yet another disservice and retraumatization to our most sensitive citizens. Seriously. We need to cut it out.

Becoming conscious is risky business.

The language of mental illness “others” people and is a human rights violation committed mindlessly by our entire culture. Forced treatment is the most obvious violence against us but microaggressions happen daily everywhere.

When separation and microaggressions are legitimized and put into public policy and discourse the way it’s been done we become second class citizens and subhumans and it’s all very acceptable as far as most are concerned.

This is an energetic reality whether people are aware of it or not. This is oppression and bigotry systemically supported and then denied by almost everyone including those most seriously affected. We internalize it and come to believe these lies.

Just like racism and yet, it’s not recognized yet (not widely…certainly there are those who fight for broad systemic change who do get it, but we are a tiny minority at this point).

“Mentally ill” is a slur for those with the greatest sensitivities to the harmful conditioning we all face and are subject to. We might say that Everyone is Mentally Ill and that some of us who are labeled as such and thus ostracized by these labels are actually the least in denial about what is happening to us and to our planet.

So yes, ¬†those of us labeled mentally ill are often closer to sanity than most of society. Language matters here and calling the most vulnerable among as mentally ill as though everyone isn’t seriously affected is a form of doublespeak. Very 1984. A manipulation that helps people remain deep in denial so that we can keep on committing atrocities against one another and the planet.¬†Everyone is Mentally Ill (yes, conditioned to the point of soul – loss) in this society and those of us labeled are often far less so even though many of us may not yet be aware of this reality.

“It is no measure of health to be well-adjusted to a sick society.” Krishnamurti

I get that it’s useful to use the language of illness for folks who attach to the illness construct as well so that we might communicate and reach out to everyone. It remains all the more important to look at and be explicit about how language is used and to clarify what we mean if we do use such language on occasion for the sake of communicating with those who might not otherwise hear us if we didn’t use such language as a bridge.

Illness used in a clinical sense within psychiatry and the establishment is often used to oppress and keep down and disenfranchise armies of sensitives (our most vulnerable and gifted members of society — healers, indeed). We need these folks fit and healthy in order to heal the world.

Wake up.

The Purpose of Life and the Human Conditioning

More:

For a multitude of ideas about how to create safe alternatives to psychiatric drugs visit the drop-down menus at the top of this page. 

Support Beyond Meds. Enter Amazon via a link from this blog and do the shopping you’d be doing anyway. No need to purchase the book the link takes you to. THANK YOU or make a donation with PayPal

Taking the Mask Off Podcast

I was recently interviewed by Taking the Mask Off -host  Cortland Pfeffer. We had good fun. I hope you enjoy it too:

View the website here:

 

Listen, Rate, and Review on ITunes:

Itunes Taking the Mask Off Podcast Ep 005 Beyond Meds

 

Listen Here  on WordPress:

podcast episode 5 beyond meds

 

https://soundcloud.com/cortland-pfeffer/taking-the-mask-off-ep005-beyond-meds

 

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