I’m an ass, you’re an ass

I was joking around on twitter and my personal FB page when I posted:

A self-help book: The people you think are assholes think you’re an asshole too.

A friend shared that Anthony DeMello once talked about writing a book called, “You’re an ass, I’m an ass.” So I looked it up and found an article from which I’ve excerpted the below, because, well, we’re all asses and Anthony DeMello speaks to this truth quite beautifully.

He also goes on to talk about how one can be with mood states and not get involved with them. Something I’ve been learning and practicing on this healing journey.  One can be witness to what goes on in the body/mind and simply look on interested while being just fine even with what would have been at one time rather destabilizing. There is a fine teaching in the below paragraph.

loveThere’s a lovely saying of Tranxu, a great Chinese sage, that I took the trouble to learn by heart. It goes: “When the archer shoots for no particular prize, he has all his skills; when he shoots to win a brass buckle, he is already nervous; when he shoots for a gold prize, he goes blind, sees two targets, and is out of his mind. His skill has not changed, but the prize divides him. He cares! He thinks more of winning than of shooting, and the need to win drains him of power.” Isn’t that an image of what most people are? When you’re living for nothing, you’ve got all your skills, you’ve got all your energy, you’re relaxed, you don’t care, it doesn’t matter whether you win or lose.

Now there’s HUMAN living for you. That’s what life is all about. That can only come from awareness. And in awareness you will understand that honor doesn’t mean a thing. It’s a social convention, that’s all. That’s why the mystics and the prophets didn’t bother one bit about it. Honor or disgrace meant nothing to them. They were living in another world, in the world of the awakened. Success or failure meant nothing to them. They had the attitude: “I’m an ass, you’re an ass, so where’s the problem?”

Someone once said, “The three most difficult things for a human being are not physical feats or intellectual achievements. They are, first, returning love for hate; second, including the excluded; third, admitting that you are wrong.” But these are the easiest things in the world if you haven’t identified with the “me.” You can say things like “I’m wrong! If you knew me better, you’d see how often I’m wrong. What would you expect from an ass?” But if I haven’t identified with these aspects of “me,” you can’t hurt me. Initially, the old conditioning will kick in and you’ll be depressed and anxious. You’ll grieve, cry, and so on. “Before enlightenment, I used to be depressed: after enlightenment, I continue to be depressed.” But there’s a difference: I don’t identify with it anymore. Do you know what a big difference that is?

You step outside of yourself and look at that depression, and don’t identify with it. You don’t do a thing to make it go away; you are perfectly willing to go on with your life while it passes through you and disappears. If you don’t know what that means, you really have something to look forward to. And anxiety? There it comes and you’re not troubled. How strange! You’re anxious but you’re not troubled.

Isn’t that a paradox? And you’re willing to let this cloud come in, because the more you fight it, the more power you give it. You’re willing to observe it as it passes by. You can be happy in your anxiety. Isn’t that crazy? You can be happy in your depression. But you can’t have the wrong notion of happiness. Did you think happiness was excitement or thrills? That’s what causes the depression. Didn’t anyone tell you that? You’re thrilled, all right, but you’re just preparing the way for your next depression. You’re thrilled but you pick up the anxiety behind that: How can I make it last? That’s not happiness, that’s addiction.  — Anthony deMello (read more)

I first started learning about being with whatever arose in the body/mind when a friend told me once, at the height of the ugly chaos that the iatrogenic damage from psychiatric drugs incurred, to be curious about my experience. I’m so grateful that I was able to hear that when I was suffering so badly. It has truly saved me 1000 times 1000 times now.

More Anthony deMello:

 

About Monica Cassani

Author/Editor Beyond Meds: Everything Matters