How are psychiatric diagnoses made?

Prof. Sami Timimi child psychiatrist and visiting professor University of Lincoln speaks. Also additional links to consider. Psych labels are descriptive of behavior but do not represent any sort of discreet biological reality. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

What if grief is the natural order of things, a way of loving life anyway?

From a young age we see around us that grief is mostly an affliction, a misery that intrudes into the life we deserve, a rupture of the natural order of things, a trauma that we need coping and management and five stages and twelve steps to get over. Here’s the revolution: What if grief is a skill, in the same way that love is a skill, something that must be learned and cultivated and taught? What if grief is the natural order of things, a way of loving life anyway? Grief and the love of life are twins, natural human skills that can be learned first by being on the receiving end and feeling worthy of them, later by practicing them when you run short of understanding. In a time like ours, grieving is a subversive act. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Today is earth day. Really EVERYDAY is earth day. Love our mother.

Recycle, re-use, buy local, walk, ride a bike, take public transport. Save our planet. It’s up to you and me. There are no other causes as important as this one because without the earth, well, we won’t have to bother fighting for the rights of human beings anymore, will we? This is it. This is the most critical issue of our time. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

‘Angels and demons’: the politics of psychoactive drugs

This is a very good article and history of (both illicit and legal) psychoactive drug use. They’re very much interconnected, as I’ve often mentioned here on Beyond Meds too. See: (Psychotropic) drugs are drugs are drugs. Legal, illicit not so significant

Joanna Moncrieff wisely concludes:
“We need to be more honest and open about the nature of prescription drugs, in order to develop more rational policies towards drug use in general. At present we are stoking the desire for mind-altering effects with medically authorised substances, some of which may be just as harmful or worse than their illicit counterparts. We may also be missing opportunities to explore the therapeutic effects of some illicit substances, like the potential of opiates to suppress psychosis as noted anecdotally by people in the field of addictions.

The regulation of psychoactive substance use is not necessarily wrong in itself, and every society will wish to preserve order and prevent the ravages that excessive drug or alcohol use can entail. We should remember that among those at the forefront of the campaign for Prohibition were women, sick and tired of the abuse they suffered at the hands of drunken husbands (4). The irrationality of current drug policy, however, acts as an impediment to the development of informed and responsible attitudes towards the benefits and dangers of psychoactive substances.”

Joanna Moncrieff

The FIAT (Financial Incentives for Adherence Trial) study, published last year, highlights the paradoxical nature of our current attitude to the use mind-altering drugs. In this randomised controlled trial people with ‘psychotic disorders’ were paid £15 a time to take an injection of an ‘antipsychotic’ drug (1). The payment increased rates of compliance only marginally, and had no effect on clinical outcomes, so the accompanying editorial suggested we need to pay people more (2).

We are now paying people to take drugs they don’t like and don’t want, while we continue to invest vast sums of public money in efforts to curb the use of drugs that people do like and do want. Prescription drugs like antidepressants, antipsychotics and so-called ‘mood stabilisers’ are widely promoted as good for your health. But the history of prescription and recreational drug use is more intimately intertwined than most people recognise. Attempts to disentangle…

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Yoga: variations on some traditional poses that allow the body to MOVE

As my regular readers know, I'm all into moving the body in many different ways. In yoga too I've been practicing (some of the time) like the guy in this video is teaching. My favorite yoga class at the moment is one that allows dance and movement of all kinds. We are told at the beginning of the class to do whatever we want including ignoring the teacher entirely. It's an incredibly healing and dynamic class where movement and sound (vocalization) are both encouraged. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

Do antidepressants work?
 And info on withdrawal

this post includes a collection of links to additional information about antidepressants and antidepressant withdrawal. 

A little non-dual Jesus for Easter

What has always been basic to resurrection, or Easter, is crucifixion. If you want to resurrect, you must have crucifixion. Too many interpretations of the Crucifixion have failed to emphasize that. They emphasize the calamity of the event. And if you emphasize calamity, then you look for someone to blame. That is why people have... Continue Reading →

Limbic Kindling — hardwiring the brain for hypersensitivity and chronic illness

This is a very interesting and important article. It's in keeping with my posts on how the autonomic nervous system is impacted in psychiatric drug withdrawal and how that is similar in many different chronic illnesses. This piece goes into a broader understanding of these issues. The author concludes that healing from these illnesses requires tending to the whole body/mind/spirit complex. This has become very clear to me as I continue to heal.

Bonfire Madigan Shive, singing and playing the anima and animus

A Saturday Mellow post…that’s rather intense. Enjoy. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

A therapist who gets it speaks

Jonathan Keyes speaks to the very serious issue of psychiatric drug withdrawal and specifically the society wide denial about the issue and the lack of support for those of us who brave the journey. … [click on title for the rest of the post]

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