Lazy woman’s post—On Borderline Personality Disorder

There is a fairly well done piece in Time magazine that I read yesterday on Borderline Personality Disorder. I thought about posting about it but wasn’t up to the analysis.

Now a commenter Andy Alt has left a comment mentioning it so I will post his comment and my response to his comment. Thank you Andy.

Maybe I’m getting excited (or anxious) again for no reason, but here is a truth injection that came from a mainstream news publication:

From TIME magazine: The Mystery of Borderline Personality Disorder By John Cloud / Seattle Thursday, Jan. 08, 2009

[…]
BPD treatment has improved dramatically in the past few years. Until recently, a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder was seen as a “death sentence,” as Dr. Kenneth Silk of the University of Michigan wrote in the April 2008 issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry. Clinicians often avoided naming the illness and instead told patients they had a less stigmatizing disorder.
[..]
Borderline patients are often overmedicated–partly because therapists see them as difficult–but for Lily, as for most borderlines, the meds did little. “Drug treatment for BPD is much less impressive than most people think,” Paris writes in Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder.
[…]

My response:

Yeah, I thought it was pretty well done myself, though I don’t think DBT is for everyone. I do think that a lot of us if not all of us with Bipolar diagnosis really just have characterological difficulties (personality disordered traits) though and that is exactly why drugs do nothing but make us worse.

I wrote in Undiagnosing myself of exactly that.

I still don’t like labeling, mostly because labels are so black and white—you either are or you’re not.

The truth is everyone on the planet has some characterological issues…

But this is a refreshing take on BPD in the mainstream media, you’re quite right.

About Monica Cassani

Author/Editor Beyond Meds: Everything Matters

7 Responses

  1. Jim

    Hi Giannakali,

    My wife is one of the more serious cases of BPD and I’ve long believed (since Bush came to be) that the FDA IS using the American public as their test lab. Or should I say that since Bush has been in office, the pharmaceutical companies have been having a hay day – as have all corportions under the Bush administration’s deregulation plan.

    There is a company out of Canada called Truehope that believes that BPD can be addressed through nutrition. My wife used their “vitamin” for a few months with what I consider to be great success. When I say great success, that means that she wasn’t depressed all the time as she is now. Now, she is on Lamictal, tried Abilify and many others, but they all make her a zombie and she doesn’t do much all day except sleep, smoke cigarettes and remain depressed.

    There were a couple of reasons that she stopped using Truehope. One, because it is based on nutrition, or lack of it, you are required to take 8 big pills every 4 to 6 hours and she has a problem taking very little pills as she feels as if she is going to choke. Two, because of the trouble she was in due to a manic episode in which she used her car to chase her old boss down and push him off the road, she was facing 30 years and since the “government” doesn’t believe in “nutrition” they required her to go back to her chemical drugs (for which they have NO clue on how they work – if they work at all sometimes) whereupon she would be tested to make sure she was on them 24/7 while she is on probation.

    But if you watch a movie called “What the Bleep do We Know”, there is a doctor, Candace Pert, who states that people can become “addicted” to emotions such as anger, hate, depression, etc. due to the chemicals produced in your body during these “moods”. And the more you allow yourself experience these moods, the more your body begins to “crave” the chemical emissions that are produced whenever these moods appear such as adrenaline when you’re mad. She states that the cells in your body evolve through time and that your lesser used receptors for essential components such as oxygen and nutrients basically shrivel away and new receptors develop on your cells that can only attach to the chemicals produced during your “mood”. So, while you may not really be mad, for some reason, your body wants you to be in that state because it now craves those chemicals, neuropeptides, etc. that are being produced. So it is a constant battle that you cannot understand.

    Apparently, my wife reads your blog and that is how I found you. I try to watch her because sometimes, her thought patterns are not always in her best interests. Her BPD has basically incapacitated her and she has a hard time leaving the house. She sees a therapist and psych, but they do little beyond “looking’ at her and using her as another recorded patient to keep their government jobs. But this is what the court demands. So we go through the motions for now because that is all we can do.

    But after seeing what Truehope has done, I do believe that the answer can be found in natural nutrition and not so much with chemicals produced in a lab for which they know very little about. I am upset and amazed that they can allow untested medications to be used on those in need of help. If they would just put half the effort into helping people with mental afflictions that they do in getting an old man a hard-on, we would all be much better off in this world.

    I wish you and your readers all the best in dealing with your situation and apologize for my crudeness. Hopefully, I’ll make it by here again, but do check out Truehope because while it may not be the answer for everyone, if it helps anyone – that would be enough.

    God bless,

    Jim

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  2. Jim

    NOTE: I’m sorry, I need to clarify that when my wife had that manic episode in which she faced a 30 year charge, it was because she was on Depakote, Lamictal and one other drug and her doctor decided to alter her medications. It was at this time, that she had a seizure while she was riding a horse in which her foot was caught in the stirrup and she suffered serious body and head injuries, which THEN caused her have a manic episode. She was on Truehope for about 6 months prior to this and while she was going to court, but when she had to switch back to chemical drugs as per the court, the episode occured.

    Thanks,
    Jim

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  3. Gianna, if necessity is the mother of invention, then laziness is the father. I’m glad to have an electric drill, an electric mixer, and a washing machine.

    Nutrition is definitely important, but at least with my BPD, I could trace it back to nurture, or lack of. There was enough abuse, neglect, abandonment to cause me to react poorly as an adult to things which are not as bad as I perceive them to be. Medications have not been helpful. I think DBT and CBT are good approaches, but Borderline Personality Disorder is especially hard to treat because the resulting “symptoms” are an effect of childhood development, and therefore very ingrained. With patience and determination I think it’s possible in many cases to improve, generally speaking. I guess I’ll be back ten years from now and let y’all know how it worked out for me. Although I first sought treatment for my depression 1992, it wasn’t until 2003 that I was diagnosed with BPD, and my psychotherapy since then hasn’t been very structured. I endeavor to improve and hopefully live until I die.

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  4. As far as the Bush Administration is concerned, as much as I like to blame him for all the problems in the world, there were dark things going on in the pharmaceutical industry before him. Check out Alison Bass’s book Side Effects for a little time travel.

    This article is somewhat related: A big pill for healthcare to swallow By Laura MacCleery and Zachary Proulx
    December 22, 2008 (Boston Globe)

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