Dealing with anger

As a culture we swing from being afraid of anger to romanticizing it. I try to see anger for what it is, in myself, and neither fear it nor idealize it. We might romanticize the idea of being in touch with our anger, but in fact we don’t really enjoy the effects of anger. If we are lost in perpetual guilt, which is anger at ourselves, we don’t celebrate that. If we see someone hurting someone else, abusing them, beating them up, or screaming at them, we don’t rejoice in it; we don’t say, “Oh, wonderful, they’re in touch with their anger!”

There is great potential for us to find a middle path with anger through mindfulness, not adding to our brutal self-judgments because of it, and not acting it out in ways that ultimately leave us isolated and regretful.

– Sharon Salzberg, “The Deluding Force,” from the Summer 1998 Tricycle. Read the complete article.

About Monica Cassani

Author/Editor Beyond Meds: Everything Matters