Rebutting Whitaker: Not Such a Good Idea

Just sharing:

Rebutting Whitaker: Not Such a Good Idea Part 1 and  Part 2

I really enjoyed both these articles written by John McManamy who makes no apologies when he generally broadly supports the use of psychotropic medications for those who receive psychiatric labels for their emotional distress.

The dialogue has begun. This is what Robert Whitaker wanted and it’s happening!

If you’ve not yet read Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America – by Robert Whitaker you can purchase it now.  Now in paperback.

**John McManamy sent an email which I’ve put in comments, clarifying his position.

About Monica Cassani

Author/Editor Beyond Meds: Everything Matters

1 Response

  1. Hey, Gianna. Thanks for shouting out my two pieces on your blog. But I need to point out you gave a very wrong impression of who I am and what I stand for. I absolutely do not broadly support the use of meds in the way you phrased it. I have always been against the practice of dumb psychiatry. My writings clearly show I do not support meds to treat labels. My writings clearly show the DSM has it all wrong and to treat “depression” (whatever the hell that is) with “antidepressants” is just plain stupid. On and on … My whole focus is on finding out what is really going on with us, and working on that, labels be damned. But if getting well for some people involves a smart meds strategy, yes – I am unapologetic about that. Emphasis on smart, and only as an adjunct to a comprehensive recovery strategy.

    I invite you to check out my mcmanweb site. It is very critical of dumb meds strategies and stupid diagnostic categories. There is a lot of emphasis on self-knowledge and recovery, especially with such tools as mindfulness.

    I’ll stop there. I’m happy to answer questions, but I would appreciate you making some kind of correction on your blog.

    John McManamy
    http://www.mcmanweb.com
    Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder (HarperCollins)

    2007 Recipient, Mogens Schou Award for Public Service

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